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Full text of "Columbia Theological Seminary Vantage: Course Catalog 1978-1979"

Columbia 6eminory 



COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Decatur, Georgia 

1978-79 CATALOG 



Vanta 




Columbio 

Theological 

6eminory 




COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
DECATUR, GEORGIA 30031 

February 1978 

Richard A. Dodds, Editor 

Nonprofit Organization 

U. S. postage paid 

at Decatur, Georgia 30031 



VontQQg— ) 



Columbia Theological Seminary, a seminary of the Presbyterian Church, U.S., 
owned by the Synods of Florida, Mid-South and Southeast and controlled through 
a Board of Directors. It is an accredited member of the Association of Theological 
Schools. 



Cover — Peggie Chamblee and Leland McCullough 



9M/2/78/D 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Purpose, Commitments, and History 

Admissions Information 

Academic Information 

Curriculum 

Course Requirements 

Courses of Instruction 

Academic Notes 

General Education Information 

Continuing Education 



Student Information 

Housing 

Financial Assistance 

Administration 

Board of Directors 

Faculty 

Roll of Students 

Calendar 

Directory for Correspondence 







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WELCOME TO COLUMBIA THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

A Seminary catalogue provides data about many things — professors, 
students, courses, fees, requirements — al! carefully detailed. Is this 
Columbia? As President, how do you answer a thoughtful, searching 
prospective student who asks, "What's it really like?" 

The authentic answer can only come from the 255 students, the ad- 
ministrators and staff, the teachers and counselors of the community. 
Three important facets of Seminary life are apparent to us: 

Columbia offers learning. In classroom, conference, chapel, refectory, 
dormitory, athletic field, library, city, church, hospital and school, signifi- 
cant learning takes place. The sharpened tools of learning, produced by 
work, struggle and discipline are assimilated. Columbia is an experience 
of learning. 

Columbia offers growth. Change occurs. No one stays the same after 
three or four years, try as one might. But here change comes from in- 
sights from the Word of God, the experience of community, the whole of 
human history, and the focus on Jesus Christ's meaning for us and the 
world. Columbia is an experience of growth. 

Columbia provides development. Out of commitment to Christ, new 
competence and skills are assumed and developed for the magnificent 
diversity of ministry. Columbia is an experience of development. 

But there is more — which can only be known if experienced person- 
ally. You can know it, if Columbia becomes your Seminary.- 




Davison Philips 
President 



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COLUMBIA SEMINARY — The History 

Columbia refers to the first permanent location of the seminary in 
Columbia, South Carolina, in 1828 a principal cultural, intellectual, 
and population center of the Southeast. 

The first idea of a theological school for the South was planted 
by the Presbytery of Hopewell (Georgia) as early as 181 7, but it was not 
until 1824 that a constitution for "The Classical, Scientific, and Theologi- 
cal Institution of the South" was adopted by the Presbytery of South 
Carolina, and the members of the presbytery were authorized to act as 
the Board of Trustees for that institution. 

In 1827, the Board recommended to the Synod that the constitution 
be altered to make the institution solely a theological seminary. (There 
had been great opposition to the proposed literary department being 
in competition with the College of South Carolina.) The official name 
of the seminary became The Theological Seminary of the Synod of South 
Carolina and Georgia; it soon became known as Columbia Theological 
Seminary — a name which was accepted as permanent in 1925. The 
revised constitution was adopted by Synod in 1828, and it was resolved 
to get the seminary into operation immediately. 

The Reverend Thomas Goulding, pastor of the Presbyterian Church 
in Lexington, Georgia, was elected the first Professor of Theology in 
December of 1828, and he gathered five students for instruction in the 
manse. Following completion of arrangements in Columbia, they moved 
to a campus there in January of 1830. 

That same year, the Reverend George Howe, a New Englander, was 
elected by the synod as instructor in languages. The following year he 
became Professor of Biblical Literature, and, shortly, librarian, overseeing 
the growth of the seminary's library from the original 300 books collected 
by the presbyteries in 1829 to more than 3,000 by 1836. Dr. Howe also 
organized the first curriculum for the seminary, apparently modeling it 
after those of the Princeton Seminary and of Andover Theological Semi- 
nary. He served nearly fifty years — until his death in 1883. 

In 1857, the Synod of Alabama established the adoption of the 
seminary as "our own, placing its name among those of the institutions 
which we call 'ours', and which we are to cherish and care for, support, 
help, and encourage as our own". Florida (as part of the Synod of South 
Georgia and Florida) joined in 1884, with Mississippi completing the 
five-synod structure in 1925. 

Among the buildings on the Columbia campus was the little chapel 

formerly a carriage house — where Woodrow Wilson was to be 
"reborn for eternity," and where the Presbyterian, U. S. Book of Church 
Order was written. 

By the 1920s, the population of the Southeast — and of Presbyterians 
in the area — was shifting, and the centers of influence were moving with 
it. Atlanta had been a transportation center since the 1880s, and so was 
developing as a commercial, industrial, educational and cultural center, 



also. Certain Atlanta Presbyterians and leaders of the seminary were con- 
vinced of the city's leadership of the New South and its advantages for 
the seminary — and of the seminary for the city. In 1924, the Board of 
Directors agreed (after two previous refusals in 1887 and 1904), and 
the decision was made to move to Atlanta, if a campaign for the new 
facilities and endowment could be successfully completed in the Synod 
of Georgia. Launched in 1925, the campaign had a goal of $500,000 
which was promptly subscribed. In that success the cooperation of the 
city's 14,193 Presbyterians in their seventy-four churches played the 
determining part. 

In 1927, the seminary transferred its Columbia traditions and ministry, 
its students and faculty, and its books and equipment to a fifty-seven 
acre Decatur, Georgia, site on the outskirts of Atlanta, joining Candler 
School of Theology and another eleven of the current twenty-three 
institutions of higher education in the greater Atlanta area. 

The early years in Decatur were difficult ones for Columbia. For a 
time, especially with the coming of the Great Depression, the future of 
the institution seemed uncertain. In 1932, however, Dr. J. McDowell 
Richards was elected president. Under his able leadership, the seminary 
experienced its greatest growth. The endowment was increased by over 
five million dollars. The present Library, Georgia Hall, Florida Hall, three 
student apartment buildings, and thirteen faculty homes were built. The 
faculty was increased from six to twenty-one full-time members and the 
student body quadrupled. Following President Richards' retirement, Dr. 
C. Benton Kline served as president until 1975 when he resigned to 
return to active teaching. Dr. J. Davison Philips, pastor of the Decatur 
Presbyterian Church, assumed the presidency on January 1, 1976. 

The Synods of Florida, Mid-South and Southeast control and support 
Columbia Seminary, and from her derive much of the strength of 
their leadership. 



PURPOSE 

Columbia Theological Seminary is an instrument of the Church, and 
its purpose and programs are formed in relation to the mission of the 
Church. Since the work of the Church is dependent in large degree upon 
its leaders, the seminary is a graduate professional school engaged in 
preparing men and women for Church leadership. As such it is an edu- 
cational institution, preparing persons for encounter with the intellectual 
problems of our world in such a way that they will be worthy of the 
respect of those to whom they witness. At the same time, it is also a 
professional school and, thus, focuses on the competences and skills 
necessary to the practice of ministry. In each dimension of its life, the 
seminary seeks to facilitate the personal growth of students, and thereby 
to deepen their love for Christ, to encourage them in spiritual maturity 
and to inspire them with a zeal for service. 



COLUMBIA'S COMMITMENTS 

Three basic commitments have marked and continue to mark Colum- 
bia Seminary's program. 

The first commitment is to Biblical authority. Faculty members all 
affirm that the Bible is the word of Cod, the only infallible rule of faith 
and practice. All our teaching and ministry grows out of this commit- 
ment. So we require serious study of the Old and New Testaments in 
the Hebrew and Greek. Theology and ethics are based on the Biblical 
ground. Student's preaching is measured by its faithfulness to the Bibli- 
cal text. Our constant appeal is to the Scripture as it is attested to be 
the word of God by the inward witness of the Holy Spirit. 

The second commitment is to doctrinal fidelity. All regular faculty 
members are ordained officers in the Presbyterian Church. Students study 
the major creeds and confessions of the Reformed tradition. The funda- 
mental affirmations of that tradition stand at the center of the educational 
experience, as faculty and students seek to express them in terms that 
speak to people who live in today's world. 

The third commitment is to ecclesiastical loyalty. Columbia Semi- 
nary was founded by the Synod of South Carolina and Georgia to 
provide leadership for the Presbyterian Church and its program. Our 
students study the polity of the church and the program of the General 
Assembly, synods and presbyteries. Our teaching and our ministry 
seek to be loyal to the Presbyterian Church, U.S., as it works out its 
life and program under the doctrinal standards, the authority of Scrip- 
ture, and the lordship of Jesus Christ, the head of the church. 

These basic commitments are fulfilled today in a different educa- 
tional style than in an earlier time. Indoctrination leads too often to 
mere rote learning and to an uncreative and wooden ministry. Our 
style of teaching and community is one of openness. The Biblical wit- 
ness, the Reformed doctrine, and the church's program are presented 
as vital options for today. Students are called to make their own com- 
mitment to them as ministers of the Gospel. 

We believe that those who enter the service of Jesus Christ must 
do so out of a conviction which is their own. Only then can they be 
the effective ministers of our Lord that our church and our world need 
today. 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE 

Students desiring admission to the basic degree program and special 
programs should request an application from the Office of Admissions. 
In addition to the completed application form, students should furnish 
the additional items indicated on that form. Test scores from the Graduate 
Record Exam and an interview with a member of the Admissions Com- 
mittee following submission of the application are required. 

Due to the sequential nature of required courses, no applicants will 
be admitted to the basic degree programs, except in July or September. 
All students granted admission to Columbia Seminary will be asked to 
submit a Letter of Intent. 

Students admitted to the seminary will be provided a health form to 
be filled out by a physician and an application for seminary housing. 

Students desiring admission to the Th.M. program should secure ap- 
plications from the Director of Advanced Studies. 

Students desiring admission to the D.Min. (in-ministry) or the S.T.D. 
programs should secure applications from the Director of Graduate Pro- 
fessional Studies, Atlanta Theological Association, Room 203 Student 
Center, Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia 30031. 

Specific admissions requirements are found for each degree in the 
Academic Information Section. 

SPECIAL AND UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Students meeting requirements for admission to the basic degree pro- 
gram but not wishing to work toward a degree may be admitted as 
special students to take courses for credit. Their program of study must 
be approved by the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

Unclassified students may be admitted to take a course of particular 
interest for credit, if prerequisites for the course are satisfied. 

AUDITORS 

Regular students, spouses of students, and other members of the 
community are invited to audit courses, with the permission of the 
instructor and provided space is available in the course. Registration as 
an auditor must be made through the office of the Dean of Academic 
Affairs at the regular time for registration. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students in good standing in other accredited seminaries may be 
admitted after transcripts have been evaluated and their applications 



approved by the admissions committee. Transfer students into the 
M.Div. program are expected to spend a minimum of 3 fourteen-week 
semesters in residence. Transfer students intending to enter the D.Min. 
(in-sequence) program ordinarily are not allowed credit for more than 
the equivalent, of one year of work prior to entering the program. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Students whose native language is not English must include with 
regular application data evidence of a score of 500 or more on the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Overseas students are ex- 
pected to have the written recommendation of their denomination. Also, 
a statement of the students' plans for future work in their native country 
is required. All students are expected to provide a statement of available 
finances for their graduate study. Columbia Seminary does not provide 
scholarships to individuals for graduate study. Normally, international 
students are accepted only for graduate work beyond the M.Div. level. 

CONFERENCES 

Each year two conferences on the ministry are held on the Columbia 
campus. During the winter the College Conference invites college juniors 
and seniors who are considering the ministry to Columbia for a week- 
end to attend classes, meet in faculty homes and have small group 
meeting with students. In the spring those who have been out of college 
for several years and who are considering a vocational change are invited 
to the campus to explore the possibilities of ministry. 

Dean Charles Cousar 




ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Columbia provides a community setting for theological education. 
In this context courses of study leading to both basic and advanced 
degrees are offered. The Master of Divinity and the Doctor of Ministry 
(in-sequence) are the first professional degrees. The Master of Theo- 
logical Studies is also a basic theological degree, but academic rather 
than professional in orientation. Advanced degrees are the Master of 
Theology, the Doctor of Ministry (in-ministry) and the Doctor of Sacred 
Theology. 

BASIC DEGREES 

Admission 

Admission to the basic degree programs at Columbia Seminary re- 
quires a four-year degree from an accredited university or college of arts 
and sciences/ or its equivalent. Students without four years of pre- 
seminary preparation are not eligible to earn degrees at the seminary 
and are not encouraged to apply for admission. When requested to do so 
by presbyteries of the Presbyterian Church in the United States, students 
without a university or college degree may be accepted for a special 
course of study. 

A major in one of the liberal arts fields is most helpful as prepara- 
tion for theological studies. Basic courses in philosophy, European and 
American history, psychology, sociology, and English grammar and litera- 
ture form the foundation for seminary studies. Students with inadequate 
backgrounds in these areas may be required to take remedial work or 
select particular electives within the seminary curriculum. 

Master of Divinity Degree and 

Doctor of Ministry Degree (in-sequence) 

At the time of entering, seminary students are admitted to "the first 
professional degree program." This means either a three component 
program leading to the Master of Divinity degree or a four component 
program leading to the Doctor of Ministry (in-sequence) degree. The 
first two components of these degrees involve a common program. The 
academic courses and supervised ministry in these initial components 
are designed to assist the student in developing intellectual tools and 
professional skills to begin the practice of ministry. At the end of the 
second component, students, together with their peers, engage in a 
process of professional evaluation leading to admission to degree can- 
didacy. The strength and areas of growth of the student are assessed so 
as to lead him or her, together with an appropriate committee, to de- 
termine whether he or she should proceed toward the Master of Divinity 
degree or toward the Doctor of Ministry degree (in-sequence). 

Students pursuing the Master of Divinity degree move to a third 



component. Students qualifying for the Doctor of Ministry degree pro- 
ceed to two further components, the first of which includes a twelve- 
month period of supervised ministry in an approved setting. The final, 
on-campus component involves, in addition to academic work, an inter- 
disciplinary seminar on ministry enabling the student to reflect on his 
or her period of supervised ministry and to complete a written project 
of substantial scope. 

The term "components" is used rather than "years" since the amount 
of time a student takes to complete the component may be more or less 
than an academic year. The A and B components represent the initial 
common program for the first professional degrees. The C component 
follows the professional assessment and represents the final stage lead- 
ing to the Master of Divinity degree. For students admitted to the Doctor 
of Ministry degree at the time of the professional assessment, the D 
component designates the twelve-month period of supervised ministry 
and the E component the final, on-campus element. 

Requirements for the M.Div. Degree 

1. There must be. on file with the seminary a complete and official 
transcript of credits showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences, or its 
equivalent. 

2. The student must be admitted to degree candidacy at the end of 
the B component. To qualify for candidacy the student must have satis- 
fied all the academic and supervised ministry requirements for the A 
and B components (as outlined on pages 18, 19, and 48) together with 
enough electives to total 74 credits. The overall grade average must be 
C or better. 

3. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all the requirements 
of the C component (as outlined on pages 18, 19, 48, and 49) with a 
total of 106 credits. The overall grade average must be C or better. 

4. The student must pass a Bible content exam administered by mem- 
bers of the Biblical Area. 

5. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a minister of the Gospel and that he or she gives 
promise of useful service in the ministry or other Church vocation. 

6. All bills to the seminary must be paid and assurance given that all 
open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. 

Requirements for the D.Min. Degree (in-sequence) 

1. There must be on file with the seminary a complete and official 
transcript of credits showing graduation with a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited university or college of liberal arts and sciences, or its 
equivalent. 

2. The student must be admitted to degree candidacy at the end of 
the B component. To qualify for candidacy the student must have satis- 
fied all the academic and supervised ministry requirements for the A 

8 



and B components (as outlined on pages 18, 19, and 48) together with 
enough electives to total 74 credits. The overall grade average must be 
B or better. 

3. The candidate must satisfactorily engage in a twelve-month period 
of supervised ministry for which a total of 20 credits is given. 

4. The candidate must satisfactorily complete all other requirements 
of the D and E components (as outlined on pages 18, 19, and 49) with 
a total of 132 credits. The overall grade average must be B or better. 

5. The student must pass a Bible content exam administered by 
members of the Biblical Area. 

6. The faculty must be satisfied that the conduct and attitude of the 
candidate is becoming a minister of the Gospel and that he or she gives 
promise of useful service in the ministry or other Church vocation. 

7. All bills to the seminary must be paid and assurance given that 
all open accounts in the community and elsewhere have been satisfied. 

Professional Assessment 

The Professional Assessment is a major review of the student's poten- 
tial for ministry that occurs after the completion of the major require- 
ments of the A and B components. This assessment will usually be sched- 
uled in the spring term of the B component or the following September 
and is a condition for the student's beginning work in either the C or D 
components. Detailed guidelines for the assessment process are given to 
the student well in advance, including criteria, data to be considered, 
composition of the assessment committee, intent of the interview, and 
possible recommendations to the faculty which might ensue. 

The admission to candidacy for either the M.Div. or D.Min. (in- 
sequence) degrees emerges from the professional assessment and must 
be approved by the faculty. At that time a student may be required to 
take a specific course or courses as a part of his or her designated elec- 
tives. 

Master of Theological Studies 

The purpose of this program is to provide systematic study of the 
Christian faith for people who are not preparing for ordination to pro- 
fessional Christian ministry. It is designed for students who want to 
broaden and deepen their understanding of the faith so that they can be 
more knowledgeable and effective Christians as lay people in the Church 
and in their lay vocations, and for others who are preparing for further 
academic work in a theological discipline (toward a Ph.D., for instance.) 
The MTS will not qualify persons for the ordained ministry, since this 
program does not include training in the practice of ministry or in other 
areas prerequisite for ordination. The Seminary hopes with this program 
not only to offer advanced study in theological disciplines to lay people 
in the Church, but also to enrich the Seminary community by the pres- 
ence and challenge of students who bring to it the questions and de- 
mand for excellence of searching, thinking, non-professional Christians. 



Students, after consultation with the professors in the field, select 
one of the following five fields for specialization: Old Testament, New 
Testament, Church History, Theology, and Ethics. A faculty adviser from 
the field of specialization is assigned by the Director of the MTS program 
to provide guidance in the selection of courses and to coordinate the 
giving of the comprehensive examinations. Language requirements are 
determined by the field of specialization. 

Students are encouraged to take appropriate courses at other institu- 
tions in the Atlanta Theological Association. No more than 15 credits, 
however, may be transferred from institutions outside the A.T.A. 

Requirements for the M.T.S. Degree 

1. Students must earn a total of 52 credits. This shall include at least 
one course in each of the five fields of specialization; an additional 
course in three of the five fields; a minimum of 17 credits in the chosen 
field of specialization; and a minimum of 9 credits in a cognate field. 

2. Students must pass written comprehensive examinations designed, 
administered, and graded by faculty members in the field of specializa- 
tion. The purpose of the examination is to test the student's capacity to 
function knowledgeably and critically in the field of specialization, to 
relate methodology and/or content from the cognate field to the field 
of specialization, and to think and write clearly. The examinations nor- 
mally come at the conclusion of the student's course work. 

3. All work must be completed within five years from the date of 
admission. 

ADVANCED DEGREES 

Columbia offers three programs leading to advanced degrees. Each 
builds on the M.Div., degree and in the case of the D.Min. (in-ministry) 
and the S.T.D. also on necessary ministry experience which has ensued 
since the reception of the M.Div. 

In addition to the resources of the faculty and library on Columbia's 
campus, graduate students are able to draw upon the resources of the 
Atlanta area. The S. T. D. program and D.Min. (in-ministry) programs are 
administered by the Graduate Professional Studies Committee of the 
Atlanta Theological Association, which coordinates and augments the 
resources of Candler School of Theology, Emory University, the Inter- 
denominational Theological Center, and Columbia. Th.M. students may 
also include in their program studies at these other seminaries. 

The resources of the Atlanta community are also available to Col- 
umbia graduate students. Pastoral counseling programs in several set- 
tings are made available through the Georgia Association for Pastoral 
Care. The Urban Training Organization of Atlanta provides resources in 
the area of urban problems and urban ministries. Numerous national and 
regional offices of denominational and interdenominational agencies are 
located in Atlanta. Other educational opportunities are available at 
Emory University, Georgia State University, and colleges in the area. 

10 



MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Admission 

Application for admission to the Th.M. program is made through the 
office of the Director of Advanced Studies. The M.Div. degree from an 
accredited seminary or divinity school, or its academic equivalent, is 
required. Ordinarily a B average in an applicant's college and seminary 
program is considered a minimum standard for admission. Except for the 
Th.M. in pastoral counseling or pastoral supervision, a knowledge of both 
the Hebrew and Greek languages is prerequisite for the program. If an 
applicant's M.Div. course required less than these two languages, he or 
she may substitute an approved language for one of them. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Students seeking a degree in Biblical, historical-doctrinal, or pastoral 
studies must be admitted to candidacy by vote of the faculty. Applica- 
tion involves the proposal of a thesis committee composed of a chair- 
person from the faculty and two other members and the proposal of a 
thesis topic, previously approved by the chairperson. This information 
must be given in writing to the Advanced Studies Committee prior to 
October 15th. The faculty meeting early in November is the deadline for 
the formal admission to candidacy if the student expects to receive the 
degree at commencement the following spring. 

Requirements for the Degree 

In order to qualify for the Th.M. degree, a student must complete 
the following within five years: 

1. at least 24 semester credits of academic work at the advanced level 
(courses numbered in the 600s) with grades that average not less than B. 
This academic work shall involve the equivalent of at least one academic 
year in partial residence. 




11 



2. an acceptable thesis, which shall constitute six additional credits. 
For students planning to graduate at the spring commencement April 
1st is the deadline for provisional approval of the thesis by the thesis 
committee and May 1st for final approval of the completed thesis. 

3. an oral examination, which shall be given after the thesis has been 
completed. 

Specialization 

Each student seeking the Th.M. degree will concentrate his or her 
studies in one of the following fields: Biblical studies, historical-doctrinal 
studies, pastoral studies, pastoral counseling, or pastoral supervision. At 
least 12 credits, in addition to the thesis, must be taken in the field in 
which the student specializes. At least six credits must be taken outside 
the field of specialization. Credit for work taken at the basic level 
(courses numbered lower than 600) must be approved prior to the taking 
of the courses by the chairperson of the thesis committee (if appointed), 
the Director of Advanced Studies, and the Dean of Academic Affairs. In 
no case shall more than 4 credits of basic level work be counted toward 
the degree. 

The Th.M. in pastoral counseling and the Th.M. in pastoral super- 
vision have additional requirements as follows: 

Pastoral Counseling 

The first year of this program requires the successful completion of 
an intern year in one of the institutions accredited by the Association for 
Clinical Pastoral Education. 

By the end of the first year, if the student is adjudged sufficiently 
competent by a multidisciplinary professional committee, he or she is 
admitted to the counseling practicum for counseling supervision in the 
Georgia Association of Pastoral Counseling and Referral Service under 
the supervision of Professor Theron Nease and Chaplain Calvin Kropp. 
Most of the counseling occurs in centers established by the Georgia As- 
sociation for Pastoral Care. Sufficient supervision of counseling, intake, 
etc., is provided to qualify the candidate for membership in the Ameri- 
can Association of Pastoral Counselors, Inc. 

In addition to the above, the student must complete 24 credits of 
advanced level academic work at a B average or better. A research pro- 
ject (non-credit) completes the requirements for the degree. 

Pastoral Supervision 

This particular specialization of the Th.M. program has been devel- 
oped for those students seeking to become certified chaplain supervis- 
ors. An intern year must be successfully completed in one of the affiliate 
institutions of the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education. The total 
number of academic credits of advanced level work required is 24 at a B 
average or better. 

12 



In addition, a residency year must also be satisfactorily completed. 
The year may be elected in any institution accredited by the Association 
for Clinical Pastoral Education, Inc. Certification as acting supervisor by 
any region of the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education will com- 
plete the requirements for the degree. 

THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (IN-MINISTRY) 

A Doctor of Ministry degree program for the working minister has 
now been formulated by the schools participating in the Atlanta Theo- 
logical Association. The program has been designed to continue the 
education of persons for their practice of ministry in the church and in 
related institutional settings. It provides an advanced, yet flexible, edu- 
cation for those whose vocation as servants of people and servants of 
Jesus Christ implies their further disciplined reflection upon, and possibly 
their further specialization within, their own ministry. 

Admission. 

Each applicant should hold an M.Div. or equivalent degree with a 
superior academic record and/or superior professional performance, and 
should have at least one year, preferably three, of professional experi- 
ence since receiving the basic degree. 

Each applicant should submit a personal statement of not more than 
ten double-spaced pages giving biographical data, academic and minis- 
try achievements, interests, goals, and personal purposes for the D.Min. 
program that will illustrate continued development. 

Advanced standing on the basis of post-M.Div. courses in other pro- 
grams will be determined by the Graduate Professional Studies Com- 
mittee of the Atlanta Theological Association after admission. 

Program of Study 

Although it may be spread over a period up to four years, the pro- 
gram of study requires participation in the equivalent of a full year of 
academic and clinical courses. The doctoral project is executed after the 
completion of these courses and usually as part of the ongoing profes- 
sional work of the minister. 

Thirty-six semester credits are required, distributed as follows: 

Six (6) credits for the core seminar in contemporary ministry and 
career assessment; 

Six (6) credits for an approved clinical experience (equivalent to one 
full time quarter); 

Six (6) credits for the doctoral project; 

Eighteen (18) credits of advanced courses. 

To assist both personal development and also course and project 
planning, each student secures a faculty adviser and a doctoral commit- 
tee. After completion of course work and before the execution of the 
doctoral project, the student will take an examination covering a range 
of subjects designated by his doctoral committee. 

13 



For students desiring to graduate at the spring commencement, 
April 1 is the deadline for provisional approval of the doctoral project 
by the project committee and May 1 for final approval of the completed 
project. 

For further information and application forms, write to Director, 
Graduate Professional Studies, ATA, Room 203, Student Center, Colum- 
bia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia 30031. 

DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY IN PASTORAL COUNSELING 

This degree is offered through the Atlanta Theological Association by 
the Candler School of Theology, Columbia Theological Seminary, and 
the Interdenominational Theological Center. It is administered by the 
Atlanta Theological Association which has responsibility for approving 
admission to the program, establishing curriculum offerings, and cer- 
tifying candidates for the award of degrees. 

The S. T. D. program focused on pastoral counseling concentrates 
upon the counseling, guidance, and consultation aspects of the minister's 
professional function. The more specialized nature of the program is re- 
flected in admission requirements and the program of studies. 

The purpose of the Doctor of Sacred Theology in pastoral counseling 
is to prepare clergy to serve as pastoral counselors in a local church or 
on the staff of a community mental health center, to serve as consul- 
tants to their fellow clergy, and to offer training in pastoral care and 
counseling at various levels. The program is designed to prepare students 
for membership as Fellows in the American Association of Pastoral 
Counselors. 

Admission 

Applicants must hold the Master of Divinity or equivalent degree 
from an accredited institution. The admission process will include: 1) an 
assessment of the applicant's academic grades and professional perform- 
ance, 2) his statement of purpose, 3) references and other materials sup- 
plied with the application, and 4) a personal interview with the director 
of the program and conducted by the S.T.D. Admissions Committee. 

In addition, applicants must have significant experience in ministry 
(approximately three years' full time employment after completion of the 
first theological degree), in clinical pastoral education (usually four con- 
secutive units), and one or more personal interviews with the pastoral 
counseling and other faculties. 

A student who, though otherwise acceptable, has not had courses in 
personality development and pastoral care equivalent to those taught in 
the participating seminaries of the Atlanta Theological Association, must 
take these courses without credit during the first two terms of his 
residence. 

Each student admitted to the program shall have one member of the 
pastoral counseling faculty as advisor. 

14 



Program of Study 

The studies included within the program will help the student (1) 
gain an advanced understanding of appropriate theological and theoreti- 
cal concepts; (2) learn under qualified supervision the application of 
these concepts in pastoral counseling and how to promote professional 
integration of theory and skills in both pastoral counseling and pastoral 
guidance; and (3) design and execute a research project appropriate to 
his or her professional practice which will give evidence of his or her 
creative ability to contribute to this aspect of pastoral counseling. 

In carrying out this program, which should not exceed six years, the 
student must complete a minimum of three Core Seminars carrying a 
total of 9 semester hours; Pastoral Counseling Practicums carrying a total 
of 18 semester hours; and Elective Courses totaling a minimum of 27 
semester hours of credit. 

The Core Seminars, carrying three semester hours each, are offered 
in the following sequence, beginning in the Fall o( the year of entry: 
I "Personality Theory," II "Diagnosis and Change;" and III "Pastoral 
Theological Method." In addition, the student enters the pastoral coun- 
seling practicum at the time he or she enters the program. 

When the student has completed these 54 semester hours of work, 
with a B average (GPA of 2.00 or better) he or she may apply to take the 
Comprehensive Examination, which tests the competence in both the 
content and performance of pastoral counseling. 

The content areas in which the student will be examined include (a) 
THEOLOGY, with the foci upon theological method and pastoral theolo- 
gy; (b) PSYCHOLOGY, including theories of personality and develop- 
ment, psychodynamics of behavior and of religious experience, and 
theories of counseling and psychotherapy; (c) SOCIO-CULTURAL DI- 
MENSIONS of Pastoral Care, including personality and culture, group 
dynamics, sociology of religion, marriage and family dynamics; (d) PAS- 
TORAL CARE, including history of pastoral care, ministerial role, guid- 
ance at the passage points of life, ministry in crisis situations, and re- 
ferrals; and (e) SUPERVISION, as a definable type of learning, interpro- 
fessional understanding of supervision, pastoral identity and authority 
in supervision. 

The performance areas in which the student will be examined include 
(a) evaluation interviewing, (b) pastoral counseling, (c) supervision, (d) 
professional maturity within the role of pastoral counselor, and (e) ability 
to relate pastoral counseling to the total ministerial role. 

The student will engage in an approved research project which dem- 
onstrates ability to utilize theological and theoretical knowledge in re- 
lation to some problem of his or her professional practice, and which 
contributes useful findings and insights to this area of theological in- 
vestigation. He or she will make a written report and undergo an oral 
examination on the project. Upon successful completion, the student 
will be certified by the Atlanta Theological Association's Graduate Pro- 
fessional Studies Committee as having passed all requirements for the 
degree of Doctor of Sacred Theology (S.T.D.) in Pastoral Counseling. 

15 



Application forms and further general information about the S.T.D. 
in Pastoral Counseling program may be obtained from: Dr. John H. 
Patton, Director, Doctoral Program in Pastoral Counseling, 1700 Clifton 
Road, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia 30329 — Telephone (404) 636-1457; or from: 
Dr. H. Milton Gardiner, Director, Atlanta Theological Association, Room 
203, Student Center, Columbia Theological Seminary, Decatur, Georgia, 
30031 — Telephone (404) 373-6366. 

CURRICULUM 

The teaching program at Columbia is arranged in four areas: Biblical, 
historical-doctrinal, pastoral, and supervised ministry. Studies in each of 
these areas are combined with interdisciplinary studies in the curriculum 
for the first professional degrees. While classroom instruction is basic to 
these first degree programs, their goal is to equip students to continue 
their education independently. The resources of the library, the structure 
of course work, and reading courses encourage early realization of that 
goal. 

Studies in the BIBLICAL area seek to help the students understand 
and interpret an ancient book, the Bible, in a world where people go to 
the moon. To do this these studies are concerned with developing tools 
and skills to understand the ancient world, its language, history, and 
thought, and tools and skills to grasp the meaning of the Bible for con- 
temporary people. Greek and Hebrew are required so that students can 
gain facility in handling the original Biblical languages and in under- 
standing the text in its native tongue. Courses in the area provide an 
opportunity for interpreting the text and for experience in articulating 
the message in a theological fashion. 

HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL studies help students understand the past 
so that they can understand the present and how we got here. Students 
engaged in these studies also struggle to form their own theology and to 
discover what it means for them to be Christian today. Since Columbia 
stands within the Reformed tradition, historical-doctrinal studies are 
concerned not only with right thinking, but also with the relation of 
Christian faith and doctrine to real life. Therefore, studies in this area 
engage students in consideration of the social, political, economic, and 
cultural life of today. In historical-doctrinal studies students acquire the 
tools they will need throughout their lives for dealing theologically with 
themselves and the world around them, tools that will enable graduates 
to lead the church in a prophetic and reconciling way as it works out its 
mission in the world around it. 

The PASTORAL area centers on the functioning of the person as a 
minister, and its concern is to train students to be ministers and to lead 
other persons in ministering. Studies in this area consider the dynamics 
of the minister's role as leader of worship, preacher, pastor, teacher, and 
administrator. Since we do not fully know today the shape of the ministry 
of tomorrow, the concern of these studies is to train students to under- 
stand the issues involved, to help them see their own strengths and 

16 



weaknesses, and then to develop a flexibility that will enable them to 
take their Biblical and theological understanding and deal with whatever 
issues they face during their ministry. 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY serves an integrative function for the curricu- 
lum at Columbia. Through its structure students are involved in the ac- 
tual practice of ministry under competent supervision. Through experi- 
ential, relational, inductive learning, the student explores within a peer 
group the forms, styles, contents, and concepts of ministry. Not only does 
the student put into practice what has been learned through studies in 
the Biblical, historical-doctrinal, and pastoral areas, but these studies 
are integrated with the practice of ministry and the personhood of the 
student. 

Columbia's faculty recognizes that the method of teaching also makes 
a significant contribution to learning. Consequently, a variety of teach- 
ing methods are empJoyed. Team teaching, which enables the professors 
themselves to participate more fully in the learning process, and which 
effectively brings different kinds of competence together in the class- 
room, is widely used. Because small groups are a part of most courses, 
creative interchange between student and student and between students' 
peers and professors is the mark of instruction at Columbia. 





Professor Shirley Guthrie 



Professor Ben Kline 



17 



COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR M.DIV. DEGREE 

(In the course descriptions notice carefully the prerequisites for each 
course.) 

Biblical Area 

A Component: B151, B152 

B Component: B241, B221, either B231 or B232 

C Component: B371 

plus a minimum of 5 elective credits in the area. 

Historical-Doctrinal Area 

A Component: HD111, HD171, HD112, HD113 
B Component: HD231, HD232, HD271 
C Component: HD331 

plus a minimum of 5 elective credits in the area. 

Pastoral Area 

A Component: Pill, P121, P141 

B Component: P231 (to be taken with SM211), either P221 or P241 

C Component: P311 

plus a minimum of 5 elective credits in the area. 

Interdisciplinary Courses 
C Component: 1311 

Supervised Ministry 

B Component: SM210, SM211 (to be taken with P231) 
C Component: S.M311 

Undesignated Courses 

A minimum of 13 additional credits. 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR D.MIN. (IN-SEQUENCE) 

(In the course descriptions notice carefully the prerequisites for each 
course.) 

Biblical Area 

A Component: B151, B152 

B Component: B241, B221, either B231 or B232 

E Component: B471 

plus a minimum of 5 elective credits in the area. 

Historical-Doctrinal Area 

A Component: HD111, HD171, HD112, HD113 
B Component: HD231, HD232, HD271 
E Component: HD431 

plus a minimum of 5 elective credits in the area. 

18 



Pastoral Area 

A Component: Pill, P121, P141 

B Component: P231 (to be taken with SM211), either P221 or P241 

D Component: P482, P451 
E Component: P411 

plus a minimum of 5 elective credits in the area 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

D Component: 1402 

E Component: 1411-412-413, 1414 

Supervised Ministry 

B Component: SM210, SM211 (to be taken with P231) 
D Component: SM41 1-41 2-41 3-41 4 

Undesignated Courses 

A minimum of 9 additional credits. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Listed on the following pages are the courses proposed by the facuHy 
of Columbia Theological Seminary for 1977-78 and 1978-79. Changes in 
faculty situations and in student needs inevitably will necessitate modifi- 
cation from term to term resulting in the failure to offer some electives 
and the substitution of others. 

The letter in the course designation is determined by the area in 
which it is offered: B for Biblical; HD for Historical-Doctrinal: P for 
Pastoral; I for Interdisciplinary; and S.M for Supervised Ministry. Courses 
whose numbers are prefaced by ATA are offered by the Atlanta Theo- 
logical Association. The hundred's digit refers to the level of the course 
and whether it is required for the basic degree program or elective: 

100s are required courses for A component students 

200s are required courses for B component students 

300s are required courses for C component students 

400s are required courses for D and E component students 

500s are elective courses designed primarily for A and B component 
students but occasionally open to advanced students by permission 
of the instructor. 

600s are elective courses designed for advanced students (C, D, E, and 
graduate students) but occasionally open to others when prerequi- 
sites are met, when space is available, and by permission of the 
instructor. 

The teen's digit identifies the particular academic discipline within 
the area, except in Interdisciplinary and Supervised Ministry courses. 

19 



BIBLICAL AREA 

FACULTY: Charles B. Cousar, Ludwig R. Dewitz (Chairperson), James H. 
Gailey, James D. Newsome, Keith F. Nickle, J. Will Ormond. 

VISITING INSTRUCTORS: Kenneth Morris (Summer 1978). 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-sequence) 

B151 PAULINE LITERATURE Nickle, Cousar 

A study of the English text of the principal Pauline letters in their his- 
torical context and present relevance. Small groups analyze and interpret 
selected Greek texts from the Pauline corpus chosen to give training in 
methods of exegesis. 
Fall 5 credits 

B152 THE SYNOPTIC GOSPELS Ormond, Cousar, Nickle 

A study of the structure, content, and theology of the Synoptic Gospels. 
Small groups analyze exegetically selected passages from the Greek text 
of the Synoptics, in light of the formation of the gospel tradition. 
Prerequisite: B151 
Spring 5 credits 

B241 SURVEY OF OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE Cailey, Dewitz 

A study of the character and content of the books of the Old Testament 
set in the context of the history of the Hebrew people, including discus- 
sion of their development from oral to written form and their place in 
the religion of ancient Israel. 
Fall 3 credits 




Students in Chapel 



20 



B221 ESSENTIALS OF HEBREW Dewitz, Gailey 

An intensive study of the essential elements of Hebrew grammar, syntax, 
and vocabulary preparatory to reading and studying exegetically the 
Hebrew Old Testament. 
Winter 4 credits 

B231* EXEGESIS OF PSALMS Dewitz 

A study of selected psalms with use of the Hebrew text, historical 

background, designed to discover theological values. 

Prerequisite: B221 

Spring 3 credits 

B232* EXEGESIS OF ISAIAH 1-12 Gailey 

A study of Isaiah 1-12 with use of the Hebrew text, historical background, 
designed to discover theological values of one of Israel's great prophets. 
Prerequisite: B221 
Spring 3 credits 

*Students in the B component are required to take one of these two 
courses. The other may be taken as an elective. 

B37K471) PREFACE TO BIBLICAL THEOLOGY Nickle, Dewitz 

The course considers issues related to an understanding of the Bible 
as the Church's book, such as the formation of the canon, authority and 
inspiration, the hermeneutical task of the Church. Opportunity is pro- 
vided for exposure to Biblical Theology as it focuses on the Old or New 
Testament. 
Prerequisites: B151, B152, B241 3 credits 

Elective Courses 

General and Background 

B510 OLD TESTAMENT MANNERS AND CUSTOMS Ga/7ey 

A study of manners, customs, and conditions of life in Old Testament 
times as illustrated from recent investigations. 

Prerequisite: P241 2 credits 

B511 EARLY CHRISTIAN LITERATURE Nickle 

Readings selected from the Apostolic Fathers, the New Testament Apo- 
crypha or the Patristic period. Readings will be studied for their theology 
and their contribution to the developing Christian movement. Specific 
readings will vary each quarter the course is offered. 
Prerequisite: HD111 2 or 4 credits 

B615 BIBLICAL APOCALYPTIC LITERATURE Nickle 

A review of the cultural and literary background out of which apocalyp- 
tic literature emerged. Exegetical analysis of typical apocalyptic texts. An 
overview of apocalyptic theology and its relation to contemporary 
concerns. 

3 credits 

21 



B618 STRUCTURES IN OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES Gailey 

An introduction to the hermeneutical techniques of structuralism with 
various stories from the Old Testament as examples. 
Prerequisite: B241 

2 credits 

B619 SURVEY OF METHODOLOGY IN OLD TESTAMENT STUDIES 

Dew Hz 

This course aims at acquainting students with the different approaches 
and methods by which the Old Testament has been studied, such as 
literary and form criticism, archeology, comparative religion and Bibli- 
cal theology. 
Prerequisite: B241 

2 credits 

Ancient Languages 

B021 ESSENTIALS OF GREEK Morris 

An intensive study of the essential elements of Koine Greek grammar, 
syntax, and vocabulary preparatory to reading the Greek New Testament. 
Required of all students not having taken Greek in college. 
Summer session only No Credit 

B620 HEBREW READING Dewitz or Gailey 

Rapid reading of selections from the Hebrew Old Testament with a view 
to increasing facility in the use of the language; emphasis on grammatical 
structures and vocabulary. 
Prerequisite: B221 1 credit 

B623 BIBLICAL ARAMAIC Ga/7ey 

A study of the Aramaic language and the reading of portions of the Old 

Testament in Aramaic. Primarily for graduate students. 

Prerequisite: B221 3 credits 

B626 GREEK GRAMMAR AND READING Cousar 

This class presupposes a basic Greek grammar course and provides an 
intensive study of syntax to develop further the student's skill in analyz- 
ing sentences, clauses, and phrases. A variety of New Testament passages 
are read. 
Prerequisite: B021 3 credits 

Old Testament Based on Hebrew Text 

B631 EXEGESIS OF JOB Ga/7ey 

Attention will be given to the central problems raised in this book with 
selections studied in detail. 

Prerequisites: B241, B221 2 or 3 credits 

22 



B632 EXEGESIS OF HOSEA Dewitz 

The exegetical study of three selected chapters. 

Prerequisites: B241, B221 2 credits 

B634 EXEGESIS OF ISAIAH 40-55 Galley 

A seminar designed to probe the work of the "great prophet of the 
Exile", using theme and structure and form studies, exegesis of some 
passages, and culminating in an interpretative project by each student. 
Prerequisites: B241, B221 

2 or 3 credits 

Old Testament Based on English Text 

B540 GENESIS 1-11 Dewitz 

A theological and critical study of the early chapters of Genesis in the 
light of the interpretation in the New Testament, with a view to finding 
the meaning for preaching today. 

2 credits 

B547 EXODUS Dewitz 

A theological and critical study of the main passages in the Book of 
Exodus with the help of traditional and modern scholarship, and with a 
view to finding the meaning for preaching today. 

2 credits 

B548 PSALMS AND WISDOM LITERATURE Dewitz 

A study of the form and content of various psalms and a consideration 
of specific features of the wisdom literature. Additional credit can be 
earned if the exegesis is based on the Hebrew text. 

2 credits 

B641 JOB Gailey 

An exploration of the thought of the Book of Job, including examination 
of its literary form, background, and contents, as well as the uses to 
which it has been put by serious thinkers. 

3 credits 

B643 JEREMIAH Ormond 

A study of the prophetic book of Jeremiah in the English text. Emphasis 
will be given to the historical setting, the character of Jeremiah, the 
prophet, the structure of the book and the exposition of selected pas- 
sages. 
Prerequisite: B241 3 credits 

New Testament Based on Greek Text 

B551 EXEGESIS OF THE GOSPEL OF JOHN Gousar or Nickle 

An exegetical study of the gospel with emphasis on structure, historical 
background and dominant motifs. Analysis of selected sections of the 
Greek text. 
Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

23 



B553 EXEGESIS OF GALATIANS Cousar 

An analysis and interpretation of the Greek text of Galatians. 
Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

B556 EXEGESIS OF THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES Nickle 

A study of its literary structure and content, use of the Hebrew Scrip- 
tures, relation to the author"s gospel, search for the author's plan and 
purpose highlighting his major theological emphases. Analysis of selected 
sections of the Greek text. 
Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

B558 EXEGESIS OF MATTHEW Cousar 

A study of the literary structure, sources, and theology of Matthew. 
Analysis and interpretation of selected portions of the Greek text. 
Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

B652 EXEGESIS OF ROMANS Cousar 

An interpretation of the Epistle to the Romans, within the framework of 
Paul's theology. 
Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

B654 EXEGESIS OF HEBREWS Nickle 

An exegetical study of the letter with emphasis on structure, historical 
background, and dominant motifs. 

Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

New Testament Based on English Text 

B561 EPISTLE TO THE EPHESIANS Ormond 

A study of the English text of the Epistle to the Ephesians in its historical 
setting with special attention to its continuing relevance in the life of 
the Church. 

2 credits 

B565 THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES Ormond 

An analysis of the literary structure, purpose, and theology of Acts, to- 
gether with a consideration of its connection with the Gospel of Luke. 

3 credits 

B566 EPISTLES TO PHILEMON AND THE PHILIPPIANS Ormond 

Philemon is analyzed as a model of the Pauline letter-form and used 
as a guide in the study of the Epistle to the Philippians. 

2 credits 

B567 THE CORINTHIAN CORRESPONDENCE Philips 

A presentation of the historical background, cultural data and principal 
personalities involved in the Corinthian letters. The relation between the 
Corinthian church and contemporary Christianity will be dealt with as 
a major emphasis. 
Prerequisite: B151 2 credits 

24 



B569 GENERAL EPISTLES Ormond 

A study of the English text of the Epistles of James, I, II Peter and Jude 
in their historical setting and present relevance. 

2 credits 

B662 GOSPEL OF LUKE Ormond 

A study of the English text of the Gospel according to Luke emphasizing 
the structure, content and message of the book. Attention is given to 
Luke as historian and theologian. 
Prerequisite: B152 3 credits 

B668 THE PARABLES OF JESUS Newsome 

An investigation of Jesus' use of the parable as a medium of communi- 
cation, with special attention to the significance which selected indi- 
vidual parables had for Jesus himself and for the New Testament church 
which preserved and recorded them. Emphasis will also be placed upon 
their contemporary meanings and upon their use as a tool in preaching. 
Prerequisite: B152 3 credits 

Biblical Theology 

B671 OLD TESTAMENT THEOLOGY Dewitz 

A study of the literature and traditions of the Old Testament, based on 
W. Eichrodt, Theology of the Old Testament. 

Prerequisite: B241 2 credits 

B672 ROLE OF THE AFTERLIFE IN THE HISTORY OF ANCIENT 

ISRAEL Dewitz 

This course is a theological pursuit of the ways in which the thought of 
the hereafter is developed in the Old Testament, leading to the New 
Testament doctrine of the resurrection of the body. 
Prerequisite: B241 2 credits 

B673 HISTORY AND THEOLOGY OF THE EXILE Newsome 

A survey of the political, military, and socio-economic history of the 
Jewish people from the Fall of Jerusalem to the Judean Restoration. 
Special attention will be given to the literature produced by prophetic 
and priestly figures and upon the manner in which the events of this 
period impacted upon Israel's relationship to God. 
Prerequisite: B241 3 credits 

B676 THEMES IN PAULINE THEOLOGY Cousar or Nickle 

Selected themes in the theology of Paul will be investigated in depth. The 
course will be structured as a seminar with student opportunity for en- 
gaging the rest of the class in a vigorous learning experience. 
Prerequisite: B151 3 credits 

25 



Independent Studies 

The following courses provide an opportunity to engage in individual- 
ized work on various problems in the Biblical area under the supervision 
of an instructor. 

B692 EXEGETICAL RESEARCH IN OLD TESTAMENT Dewitz or Gailey 
Any term Up to 4 credits 

B693 RESEARCH IN OLD TESTAMENT CRITICISM OR 

THEOLOGY Dewitz or Gailey 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

B695 EXEGETICAL RESEARCH IN NEW TESTAMENT Cousar or Nickle 
Any term Up to 4 credits 

B696 RESEARCH IN NEW TESTAMENT CRITICISM OR 

THEOLOGY Cousar, Nickle or Ormond 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

HISTORICAL-DOCTRINAL AREA 

FACULTY: Frederick O. Bonkovsky, T. Erskine Clarke, Catherine Gunsalus 
Gonzalez, Shirley C. Guthrie, Jr. (Chairperson), C. Benton Kline 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min (in-sequence) 

HD111 THE CHURCH THROUGH THE REFORMATION 

PERIOD Gonzalez 

An introduction to the history of the Church, including its doctrine, 
structure, and interaction with the surrounding culture. The period from 
the close of the New Testament times through the seventeenth century 
will be studied. 
Fall 5 credits 

HD171 CONTEXT OF MINISTRY Bonkovsky 

A study of the values, systems and structures which form the context 

for ministry in the United States today to provide insights and skills for 

contemporary Christian witness. 

Prerequisite: Pill 

Winter 2 credits 

HD112 THE MODERN CHURCH Gonzalez 

A continuation of HD111. Covers the period from the beginning of the 

eighteenth century to the present, excluding the history of the Church 
in the United States. 

Spring 2 credits 

26 



HD113 HISTORY OF THE CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES Kline and Clarke 

An introduction to the history of the life and thought of the churches 
in the United States, the course is designed to enable students to bring 
an historical understanding of the crises they will face in the ministry, 
and to come to an awareness of the relationship of religion and culture 
in American life. 
Spring 2 credits 

HD231-232 REFORMED THEOLOGY Guthrie and Kline 

A study of the doctrines of Reformed theology based on Calvin's Insti- 
tutes, the confessional writings of the Reformed tradition and the works 
of various contemporary Reformed theologians in conversation with 
other theological traditions and in the context of the ecumenical faith 
shared by all Christians. 
Prerequisites: HD111, HD112 

Fall 4 credits 

Spring 2 credits 

HD271 CHRISTIAN ETHICS Bonkovsky 

A study of the Biblical, theological and philosophical foundations of 
Christian ethics for guidance in Christian decision-making. 
Prerequisite: HD171 
Spring '. 3 credits 

HD331 (431") CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY Guthrie, Kline, Gonzalez 
A study of the efforts to express the truth of the Christian faith in the 
context of the thought forms and issues of contemporary life in the 
church and the world. 
Spring 3 credits 

Elective Courses 

Historical Studies 

HD511 HISTORY OF THE DEVOTIONAL TRADITION OF THE 

CHURCH Gonzalez 

A consideration of the classic literature from various movements within 
the church's history that have stressed the devotional life, including 
forms of monasticism, certain of the mystics, and later authors from 
both Protestant and Roman Catholic circles. 

2 credits 

HD513 STUDIES ON MYSTICISM IN THE WESTERN CHURCH Gonzalez 
A study of some of the major literature of mysticism from the medieval 
and reformation periods of the Western Church. In addition, a general 
survey of the history of Western mysticism and its place in the Church 
will be included. 
Prerequisite: HD111 3 credits 

27 



HD610 NORTH AFRICAN THEOLOGY, A.D. 150-550 Gonzalez 

A seminar in which we will study the writings of the major theologians 
of this early Western form of Christian thought. Study will focus on 
Tertullian, Cyprian, Augustine, and the controversies after Augustine We 
will consider the social and political context of the church in North 
Africa as well as the theological content of the material. 
Prerequisite: HD111 3 credits 

HD525 ISSUES IN AMERICAN CULTURE Clarke and Huie 

A study of critical cultural issues with special emphasis on technology 
and its influences on contemporary American life. 

2 credits 

HD529 THE CHURCH AND WOMEN Gonzalez 

A seminar in which we will study the place women have held in the 
Church throughout its history, and the attitude of the Church toward 
women. We will also discuss the present situation of women in the 
Church and view theologically the questions that are being raised by and 
about women. 

3 credits 

HD620 A HISTORY OF THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, U.S. Clarke 

A study of the ways Presbyterians in the South have developed in rela- 
tion to a changing society. Special attention will be given to develop- 
ments in theology, social concerns, and institutional structures. 
Prerequisite: HD113 3 credits 

HD621 THE CITY IN AMERICAN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT Clarke 

A study of the changing and recurring interpretations of the city in 

American religious thought. Beginning with the Puritans and moving 

through evangelicals and social reforms to Harvey Cox and his critics, 

we will explore how various images of the city have influenced American 

Christians. 

Prerequisite: HD113 3 credits 

HD622 RELIGION IN THE SOUTH Clarke 

A study of the religious heritage of the South. Special attention will be 

given to the role of slavery and race in developing a southern religious 

tradition. 

Prerequisite: HD113 3 credits 

Doctrinal Studies 

HD530 INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY Guthrie 

A course for beginning students to introduce them to the nature and 
task of systematic theology, its language, structure, and relation to other 
disciplines. 

2 credits 

28 



HD536 THE THEOLOGY OF JONATHAN EDWARDS Kline 

A study of major themes in the theology and preaching of Edwards. 

3 credits 

HD633 THE THEOLOGIES OF SCHLEIERMACHER AND 

KIERKEGAARD Gonzalez 

A lecture course in which we will study the thought of these two major 
19th century theologians. Special attention will be given to comparing 
the structure of their theologies and to their influence on 20th century 
thought. 
Prerequisites: HD111-112 3 credits 

HD634 THE THEOLOGY OF KARL BARTH Guthrie 

A seminar which studies intensively a section of the Ghurch Dogmatics. 
Prerequisites: HD231-232 2 credits 

HD637 THE THEOLOGY OF PAUL TILLICH Kline 

A study of one or more sections of Systematic Theology in the context 
of classical Christian theology and contemporary theological thought. 
Prerequisites: HD231-232 or permission of the instructor. 

3 credits 

HD639 THE CHRISTOLOGY OF JURGEN MOLTMANN Guthrie 

A seminar dealing with Moltmann's understanding of the death and res- 
urrection of Christ. 
Prerequisites: HD231-232 

2 credits 




Professors Bonkovsky and Keith with Dick Dodds 



29 



HD543 THE DOCTRINE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT Guthrie 

A study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in classical and contemporary 
theology to discover the place of the Spirit in the church's life today. 

2 credits 

HD546 THEOLOGY OF LITURGY Gonzalez 

A lecture and discussion course on the doctrinal significance of liturgical 
practice: the liturgical year, the sacraments, parts of worship, etc. Spec- 
ial attention will be given to the interpretation of Biblical texts within the 
liturgical setting in which they are to be employed. 

3 credits 

HD644 PREACHING AT THE OCCASION OF THE SACRAMENTS 

Gonzalez 
A seminar-workshop which will be concerned with the relationship of 
preaching and the sacraments. Particular attention will be given to the 
hermeneutical significance of the sacraments in Biblical interpretation, 
as well as to the theological significance of preaching on sacramental 
occasions. 

4 credits 

HD647 LIBERATION THEOLOGY Guthrie 

A study of various theologies written from the perspective of people 
who are oppressed and excluded. Special attention is given to theologies 
coming from the "third world" and from blacks. 
Prerequisites: HD231-232 2 credits 

HD649 CONFESSIONAL LITERATURE OF THE REFORMED CHURCHES 

Guthrie 
A seminar making a comparative study of the Reformed Confessions of 
the sixteenth, seventeenth, and twentieth centuries. 
Prerequisites: HD231-232 4 credits 

Philosophical Studies 

HD551 PHILOSOPHICAL INTRODUCTION Kline 

A study of philosophical questions, terminology, and systems as thev 
relate to the theological formulations of the church. 

2 credits 

HD554 THE PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION Kline 

A study of classical and contemporary explorations of the nature of re- 
ligion, religious knowledge, the existence and nature of God, and the 
relation of God to the world. 
Prerequisite: A basic course in philosophy 3 credits 

HD652 THEOLOGY AND LANGUAGE Kline 

An exploration of the nature of religious language and problems of 
theological expression. 

Prerequisites: HD231-232 2 or 4 credits 

30 



HD655 PROCESS PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY Kline 

A study of the impact of Whitehead, Hartshorne, and evolutionary 
thought on contemporary theological formulation. 
Prerequisite: A course in modern philosophy or permission of instructor 

3 credits 
Mission and Ecumenics 

HD561 SEMINAR ON INTERNATIONAL MISSION 

A seminar covering motives, methods, and issues in international mis- 
sions, at home and overseas. 

2 credits 

HD664 CONTEMPORARY ROMAN CATHOLIC THEOLOGY Gonzalez 
A view of recent developments in Roman Catholic theology based par- 
ticularly upon the documents of the Second Vatican Council and the 
writings of Karl Rahner. 
Prerequisites: HD111-112 

4 credits 
Ethics and Society 

HD576 BIBLICAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

In whatever activities persons are involved, public or private (e.g. re- 
ligion, politics, marriage, sex, economics, war), the commands of God 
reach us. A study of Biblical Ethics thus centers on the authority they 
bring to our lives and the directions in which we are led. 
Prerequisites: Previous work in Bible and in Ethics 

3 credits 

HD671 ETHICS AND PARISH LIFE Bonkovsky 

Numerous ethical questions arise in the contemporary parish. This course 
focuses on several major issues and on the ways in which the Christian 
community does ethics and ministry. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics 3 credits 

HD672 ETHICS AND INTERNATIONAL POLICY Bonkovsky 

Consideration of the ways in which nations and other international ac- 
tors, such as churches and multi-national corporations, act, with special 
attention to the values which do and may influence behavior. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics 

3 credits 

HD673 ETHICAL ISSUES IN CIVIL SOCIETY Bonkovsky 

Utilization of Biblical, theoretical, and empirical data in consideration 
of several important issues, such as economics, money, obligations, 
amnesty, censorship, and pornography. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics 3 credits 

HD674 BIO-MEDICAL AND SEXUAL ETHICS Bonkovsky 

Christian teaching is brought to bear on certain selected issues, such as 
abortion, genetic manipulation, death policy, and the sexual revolution. 
Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics. 

3 credits 

31 



HD675 ETHICS AND URBAN LIFE Bonkovsky 

Consideration of ethical issues in the history and current life of Ameri- 
can cities, especially Atlanta, Georgia. A central, organizing theme is the 
relation of sub-sections of the city to the interests of the broader urban 
community. 

Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics and permission of the instructor 

HD677 ANALYSIS FOR COMMUNITY MINISTRY Bonkovsky 

Designed for D.Min. (in-ministry) and other advanced students, this 
course concerns itself with the on-going interests of the students. Par- 
ticular attention is paid to the theological and empirical methodology 
involved in church and community and theology and society. 

Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics 

3 credits 

HD678 ETHICAL THINKERS Bonkovsky 

A study of the writings of several recent ethicists with special attention 
to their methods and sources in "doing ethics." Thinkers may include 
Bonhoeffer, Brunner, Frankena, Gustafson, Haering, H. R. Niebuhr, and 
Ramsey. 

Prerequisite: Previous work in Ethics 

3 credits 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES 

The following courses provide an opportunity to engage in individual- 
ized work on various topics in the Historical-Doctrinal Area under the 
supervision of an instructor. 



HD691 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY 
Any term 



Clarke, Gonzalez 
Up to 4 credits 



HD693 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN THEOLOGY 
Any term 



Guthrie, Kline 
Up to 4 credits 



HD695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PHILOSOPHY 
Any term 



Kline 
Up to 4 credits 



HD696 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MISSION AND ECUMENICS 

Gonzalez 



Any term 



Up to 4 credits 



HD697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ETHICS 
Any term 



Bonkovsky 
Up to 4 credits 



32 



PASTORAL AREA 

FACULTY: Wade P. Huie, Jr., Oscar J. Husse! (chairperson), Jasper N. 
Keith, Thomas H. McDill, Theron S. Nease, Hubert V. Taylor. 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D.Min. (in-sequence) 

Pill BECOMING A MINISTER TO PERSONS Staff 

This course seeks to enable students to grow in their understanding of 
persons and the nature of ministry. It provides a foundation for other 
disciplines within the pastoral field. Topics considered are: the church's 
ministry, personal development, and community life. 
Fall 3 credits 

P121 THE MINISTRY OF TEACHING Hussel 

An introduction to the teaching ministry of the church, including the 
philosophy and structure of Christian education, and the place of edu- 
cational work in the life of the congregation. Attention will be given to 
the involvement of the pastor in education and the development of an 
educational style of ministry. 
Prerequisite: Pill 
Spring 3 credits 

P141 THE MINISTRY OF WORSHIP WITH PREACHING Huie, Taylor 
A study of the ministry of public worship in Its traditional and contem- 
porary expressions with special concern for preaching as it relates to the 
Biblical text, the congregation, and the preacher. 
Prerequisite: Pill 
Spring 3 credits 

P231 THE MINISTRY OF PASTORAL CARE McDill 

Anticipating a ministry to persons in normal and abnormal situations, 
including gross crises, students will be exposed to persons in extreme 
situations. Psychodynamic and theological investigations will accompany 
the discussion of verbatim material reported. Each student is required to 
take SM211 in conjunction with this course. 
Prerequisite: Pill 
Fall or Spring 2 credits 

P221* PLANNING THE EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM OF THE 

CONGREGATION Hussel 

Beginning with the intentional nature of education, general models of 
planning will be examined and applied for education locally. Diversity 
of congregations, analysis of leadership needs, choosing curriculum, 
support of teachers and evaluation in terms of the mission of the church 
will be given special attention. 

Prerequisite: P121 

2 credits 

33 



P241* PRACTICUM IN WORSHIP AND PREACHING Huie, Taylor 

Students prepare worship services in detail and develop as communica- 
tors of the Gospel with the help of video and by preaching in a local 
church before a group of lay people, peers, and the professor. 

Prerequisite: P141 

Fall and Spring 2 credits 

*Students are required to take at least one of these two courses during 
the B component and may take the other as an elective. 

P31 1(411) CHURCH STRUCTURES Hussel and Staff 

Through study of polity, of the social context and shape of religion, of 
denominational and congregational organization, the students will be- 
gin to comprehend the church both as an institution and as an agent 
for mission, and begin to identify their participation in it. 

Fall 3 credits 

P451 PREACHING AND CONGREGATION Huie or Ormond 

A laboratory course where intern students work together in the prepara- 
tion and evaluation of sermons. Special attention is given to the setting 
in which the preaching takes place. Required only of D component 
students during the intern year. 
Spring 2 credits 

P482 CHURCH ADMINISTRATION Hussel 

Beginning with an analysis of personal administrative style, skills in 
management, such as planning, problem-solving, organizing and evalua- 
ting, are developed and organizational development principles will be 
identified and implemented. Readings will be applied to intern work. 
Required only of D component students during the intern year. 

Fall 2 credits 




34 



Elective Courses 

General 

P513 PERSONS AND MINISTRY Nease 

The issues of adulthood, vocation, parenting, and aging are studied as 
these relate to ministry. The course builds on the foundation provided 
by Pill and seeks to deepen understanding of ministry to persons in 
their development. 
Prerequisite: Pill 

2 credits 

P612 PREACHING AND PASTORAL CONCERNS Hule, Nease 

A seminar-laboratory to study pastoral situations such as guilt, conflict, 
anxiety, grief, success, parenthood, old age, etc. as a background for 
the preparation of written sermons which address people in these sit- 
uations. 
Prerequisites: P111, P141 

3 credits 

Christian Education 

P522 BECOMING A SKILLED TEACHER Hussel 

A workshop approach to learning such teacher skills as writing lesson 
goals, developing a lesson plan — including activities and resources selec- 
tion — classroom control and evaluation procedures. 

2 credits 

P527 ADULT EDUCATION IN THE CONGREGATION Hussel 

A study of the adult and of adult education for participation in the life 
and mission of the church and for the Christian life. 
Prerequisites: Pill, P121 

3 credits 

P621 IMPROVING TEACHER AND LEADER EFFECTIVENESS Hussel 

The focus is on increasing the effectiveness of teaching in the congrega- 
tion. The pastor's role in teacher and leader training, recruitment of 
leaders, personal teaching skills development, evaluation of leader and 
teacher development programs will be considered. A major ingredient 
of the course is an INSTROTEACH workshop. 
Prerequisite: P121 

3 credits 

P623 CHRISTIAN EDUCATION AND THE CHILD Hussel 

An exploration of the developmental needs of the growing child, the 
place of the child in the congregation and its life, and the principles of 
elementary curriculum organization, with observation and experience 
in childhood and intergenerational teaching situations. 
Prerequisites: P111, P121 

3 credits 

35 



P625 YOUTH MINISTRY IN THE CHURCH Hussel 

A seminar on the sociological and psychological basis for ministry with 
youth and on the design of youth programs, including leadership and 
educational resources. 
Prerequisites: Pill, P121 2 or 3 credits 

Pastoral Care and Counseling 

P534 PASTORAL CARE OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY LIFE Nease 

This course focuses on current developments and issues in marriage 
and family life as these relate to ministry. Various types of ministry to 
marriage and family life will be explored. Particular attention will be 
given to a theological understanding of marriage and family life. 
Prerequisite: Pill 

2 or 3 credits 



P631 RESEARCH IN PASTORAL CARE McDill 

This course will examine research projects that have been conducted in 
various disciplines, with special reference to the methodology employed 
and their relevance for pastoral care. Requirements include seminar 
presentations of research projects and a term paper that seeks to deal 
with the role of research in pastoral care. Primarily for graduate students 
in the field. 

3 credits 



P632 RESEARCH IN PASTORAL COUNSELING McDill 

The student will be expected to examine the literature in the field of 
pastoral counseling and will spend some time on problems of research 
in case studies. Primarily for graduate students in the field. 

3 credits 



P633 RESEARCH IN PASTORAL PSYCHOLOGY McDill 

This is a course of directed study in the science of man with special 
emphasis on psychological theories of personality. The work will be 
patterned to meet the needs of graduate students pursuing major studies 
in this field. 

3 credits 

P635 THEOLOGY AND PASTORAL CARE Nease 

This course seeks to understand basic theological issues as they are 
demonstrated in actual pastoral care situations. The design of the study 
is to begin to relate theological understanding to pastoral functioning. 
Students will be asked to present for discussion pastoral situations 
emerging from their experience. 
Prerequisites: P111, P231 2 or 3 credits 

36 



P636 REFORMED THEOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENTAL 

PSYCHOLOGY McDill 

Various psychological theories of personality development are examined 
from a pastoral theological perspective. A critical evaluation from a 
Reformed theological viewpoint is expected from the students. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the professor. 3 credits 

P637 THEOLOGY OF HUMAN PERSONALITY McDill 

The discussions and research of this course wil be devoted to a con- 
sideration of the sciences of personality and a theological interpretation 
of these sciences. This study is designed to give the student a compre- 
hension of the psychodynamics of personality from both a scientific and 
a theological understanding in order to equip him/her for a more ef- 
fective ministry as a theologian, pastor, and preacher. 
Prerequisites: Pill, P231 3 credits 

P638 GRADUATE COUNSELING PRACTICUM Staff 

Graduate students in the pastoral counseling program are admitted to 
one of the several local pastoral counseling centers to work with per- 
sons in trouble, referred primarily by pastors, under careful supervision. 
For the completion of the graduate degree in pastoral counseling, it is 
expected that a student will have sufficient supervision, in addition to 
other requirements, to qualify for membership in the American Associa- 
tion of Pastoral Counseling, Inc. Limited to students in either the Th.M. 
in Pastoral Counseling or the S.T.D. in Pastoral Counseling Programs. 
Prequisite: Oral examination by an interdisciplinary group of pas- 
tors, theological professors, psychiatrists, and supervisors. This group 
meets once each term. 

non-credit 
(except for S.T.D. students) 

P639 GROUP DYNAMICS AND PASTORAL COUNSELING 

McDill and Nease 
This seminar includes specialized instruction in the field of group pro- 
cesses and dynamics, plus individual care and staff participation. This 
four-quarter sequence involves intensive study in various problems of 
modern urban living. In addition to seminar discussion, observations 
of individual and group counseling, it is expected that each student will, 
under supervision, function as a group counselor. 

Prerequisite: An intern year in clinical pastoral education. Limit: 4 

3 credits 

Worship 

P544 THE HYMNS OF THE CHURCH Taylor 

To enable the pastor to plan intelligent use of the Church's musical heri- 
tage through an understanding of its historical development and effec- 
tive practice. Attention is given to both texts and tunes of hymns as well 
as to some of the choral and instrumental masterworks these have in- 
spired. 

2 credits 

37 



P641 SPECIAL WORSHIP SERVICES Huie 

A seminar-laboratory course in which we seek to understand the mean- 
ing of special occasions for worship such as baptism, communion, fu- 
nerals, weddings, etc., and learn creative and effective ways of leading 
them. 
Prerequisite: P141 

3 or 4 credits 

P648 REVITALIZING WORSHIP IN THE CONGREGATION Taylor 

The principles and practices that lead to renewal and meaningful 
Christian worship are explored in an effort to develop both creative and 
critical approaches in the pastorate. 
Prerequisite: P141 

4 credits 
Preaching 

P652 VARIETY IN PREACHING Huie 

A laboratory course in the approach to and preparation of a variety of 
types of sermons such as communion, funeral, doctrinal, evangelistic, 
biographical, multi-media. 
Prerequisite: P141 

2 or 3 credits 
P653 STUDIES IN THE HISTORY OF PREACHING 
A study of highlights in the history and development of preaching from 
the Old Testament to the present, observing its form, themes, and place 
in the life of the Church. 
Prerequisite: P141 2 or 3 credits 

P655 CONTEMPORARY PREACHING Huie 

A seminar that focuses on issues in contemporary preaching and on the 
messages and methods of selected contemporary preachers. Class ses- 
sions include presentations by a variety of local ministers. 
Prerequisite: P141 

3 credits 

Communication 

P560 THE MINISTER AS A SPEAKER Taylor 

A study of the principles of healthy and effective vocal expression and 
the application of these to speech in pulpit, committee meeting, and 
conference. 

3 credits 

P662 STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION THEORY AND PREACHING 

Taylor 
To investigate the relationship of rhetorical theory to preaching through 
the works of such representative theorists as Aristotle, Augustine, George 
Campbell and Kenneth Burke. 
Prerequisite: P141 and permission of the instructor 4 credits 

38 



P663 GOOD NEWS NOW: CULTURE, THE GOSPEL AND 

ITS COMMUNICATION TODAY Taylor 

A seminar to view and analyze video tapes of contemporary services 
with preaching and to tape in color and evaluate portions of sermons by 
class members. 

3 credits 

Evangelism 

P571 EVANGELISM 

This course studies the theological basis for evangelism, a comprehen- 
sive program for commitment, and ways to enable the laity to support 
the outreach of the Church. 

2 credits 

P572 A PASTOR'S PROGRAM OF EVANGELISM Dodds 

The course seeks to explore the meaning, the message, the motive and 
the methods of evangelism. A special emphasis is placed on the pastor's 
role in enabling the people of his parish to develop a viable program 
of outreach and witness. 

2 credits 
Church Administration 

P681 ADMINISTRATION IN THE CHURCH 

A course to develop an understanding of administration as the process of 
working with persons, both individually and in groups, to aid the church 
in its task and mission. 

2 credits 

Independent Studies 

The following courses are designed for students who are interested in 
further study beyond the regular course offerings in the Pastoral Area. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 



P691 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN MINISTRY 
Any term 



Keith 
Up to 4 credits 



P692 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION Hussel 

Any term Up to 4 credits 



P693 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PASTORAL THEOLOGY 



AND COUNSELING 
Any term 

P694 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN WORSHIP 
Any term 

P695 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN PREACHING 
Any term 



McDill or Nease 
Up to 4 credits 

Huie or Taylor 
Up to 4 credits 

Huie or Taylor 
Up to 4 credits 



39 



P696 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SPEECH AND COMMUNICATIONS 

Taylor 
Any term Up to 4 credits 

P697 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN EVANGELISM 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

P698 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN POLITY AND CHURCH 

ADMINISTRATION Hussel 

Any term Up to 4 credits 

INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D. Min. (in-sequence) 

1311 THE MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH Staff 

This course considers the mission of the church in the contemporary 
world and the relation of the ordained minister to the local congregation, 
presytery, and ecumenical church. Special attention is given to evan- 
gelism, national and international missions, the relation between clergy 
and laity, and the place of the church in the civil community. 

Required of all M.Div. students. 

Spring 5 credits 

I402 EVALUATION AND PROJECTION OF MINISTRY 

DEVELOPMENT Keith, Hussel 

At the conclusion of the intern year, D.Min. (in-sequence) students are 
given an opportunity to evaluate their development in ministry. Two 
major tasks in this evaluation involve the writing of a paper on the under- 
standing of ministry and the beginning of a doctoral project proposal. 
Summer 2 credits 

1411-412-413 DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR Hussel 

This seminar for D.Min. (in-sequence) candidates includes development 
of a project proposal and securing of a project committee, completion of 
the theory of ministry paper, and research and writing of the dissertation. 
As necessary, research methods and dissertation format are included. 
Prerequisites: SM41 1-41 2-41 3-41 4 

Fall 2 credits 

Winter 4 credits 

Spring 2 credits 

1414 ADVANCED SEMINAR IN MINISTRY Staff 

This seminar for D.Min. (in-sequence) candidates focuses on a final 
assessment for ministry and includes consideration of evangelism, na- 
tional .and international missions, the relation between clergy and laity, 
and the place of the church in the civil community. 

3 credits 

40 



Elective Courses 

1601 FROM TEXT TO SERMON Huie and Ormond 

A laboratory course using one particular book of the Bible where stu- 
dents work from particular texts to completed sermons. 
Prerequisite: P141 3 credits 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Required Courses for M.Div. and D. Min. (in-sequence) 

SM210 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: PARISH 

This educational program is designed to provide experiential, relational, 
inductive learning in the practice of ministry in, to, with, and through 
the church under the supervision of an experienced Minister of the 
Word. Supervising pastors and teaching congregations are chosen on the 
basis of their commitment to participate in the professional education 
of the ministry as well as the opportunities for learning afforded by their 
setting and context for ministry. The student is expected to be involved 
in broad dimension of ministry including preaching, program, adminis- 
tration, and pastoral care. Supervisors and placements are approved by 
the Director of Supervised Ministry and the First Professional Degree 
Committee. 
Summer 6 credits 

SM211 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: HOSPITAL 

This course, taken in conjunction with P231 during the B Component 
includes an intensive involvement in ministry to persons in a clinical 
setting together with seminars to reflect on the nature of that involve- 
ment. Supervision and placement are provided through accredited CPE 
Centers in the metropolitan Atlanta area. 
Fall or Spring 3 credits 

SM311 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: URBAN 

This course, taken during the C Component, involves supervised work in 

an urban agency, with appropriate reading and reflection seminars. 

Supervision and placements are arranged through the Urban Training 

Organization of Atlanta. 

Fall or Spring 2 credits 

SM41 1-41 2-41 3-41 4 SUPERVISED MINISTRY: INTERN YEAR 
A twelve-month period of supervised ministry in a setting consistent 
with the student's vocational goals and approved by the Director of 
Supervised Ministry is required of all candidates for the D.Min. (in- 
sequence) degree. The essential purpose of this internship is minister- 
formation under competent supervision. Supervisors and contexts of 
learning are chosen on the basis of commitments to and opportunities 
for a student's learning the work of ministry. An additional academic 
component is also required. It is further expected that the Biblical, his- 

41 



torical-doctrinal, and pastoral concepts of ministry will be integrated with 
the practice of ministry engaged in during the internship. 
Twelve-month period 20 credits 

Elective Courses 

SM610 CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Columbia Theological Seminary is a member of the Association for 

Clinical Pastoral Education. A student may participate in a unit of Basic 

CPE in those institutions accredited by ACPE. Placements are coordinated 

by the Director of Supervised Ministry. 

Any term, usually Summer 6 credits 

SM61 1-61 2-61 3-61 4 CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION: INTERNSHIP 
Students may participate in units of Advanced CPE in institutions ac- 
credited by ACPE. Placements are coordinated by the Director of Super- 
vised Ministry. 

Twelve-month period 20 credits 

(non-credit for Th.M. students) 

SM615 SUPERVISED URBAN CLINICAL 

Through the Urban Training Organization of Atlanta, students negotiate 

work placements and serve under both field supervisors and supervisors 

from the staff of UTOA. Learning contracts with UTOA are coordinated 

through the Director of Supervised Ministry. 

Any term, usually Summer 6 credits 

SM61 6-61 7-61 8-61 9 SUPERVISED URBAN INTERN YEAR 
An intern year negotiated with the Urban Training Organization of Atlanta 
may be coordinated through the Director of Supervised Ministry. 
Twelve-month period 20 credits 

S.T.D. AND D.MIN. (IN-MINISTRY) COURSES 

The S.T.D. and D.Min. (in-ministry) programs consist of advanced courses 
provided by participating schools in the Atlanta Theological Association. 
The 600 level courses in this catalog, together with advanced courses 
at the Candler School of Theology and the Interdenominational Theo- 
logical Center, are open to students in these programs. The following 
list includes other courses specifically developed for the S.T.D. and 
D.Min. (in-ministry) programs. 

ATA401 SEMINAR ON MINISTRY 

Basic seminar on ministry theory and career analysis required of all 

D.Min. (in-ministry) students 6 credits 

ATA462 THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODERN PASTORAL COUNSELING 
Modern history of pastoral counseling, its roots in theology, psycho- 
analysis, existential and humanistic psychology. 

3 credits 

42 



ATA471 SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY THEORY 

Contemporary personality theories are reviewed to assess their rele- 
vancies for pastoral counseling. First term of S.T.D. in Pastoral Counseling 
Core Seminar. 

3 credits 

ATA473 DIAGNOSIS AND CHANGE 

The process of evaluation and change are considered from both pastoral 
and psychological perspectives. Second term of S.T.D. in Pastoral Coun- 
seling Core Seminar. 

3 credits 

ATA475 PASTORAL THEOLOGICAL METHOD 

Seeks to develop a pastoral theology consistent with both systematic 
theology and pastoral practice. Third term of S.T.D. in Pastoral Counsel- 
ing Core Seminar. 

3 credits 

ATA477 SEMINAR ON PASTORAL SUPERVISION 

Provides doctoral students in pastoral counseling and general ministry 

experience of pastoral supervision under supervision. Acquaints the 

student with the expanding literature on supervision from a variety of 

disciplines. 

3 credits 

ATA485 COUNSELING PRACTICUM 

In each term the student engages in from two to four hours of coun- 
seling per week under supervision. Assigned readings and appropriate 
didactic materials are included. (Students will register for ATA485a, 
ATA485b, ATA485c, and ATA485d for a total of 24 quarter hours or 18 
semester credits). 



ATA 489 DIRECTED STUDY 
For D.Min. and S.T.D. use. 



ATA490 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 



ATA492 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 



ATA494 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 



Credit as assigned 

4 credits 
4 credits 
4 credits 



ATA496 DOCTORAL PROJECT 

For D.Min. use. In cases where the project so registered extends over 

several terms, the student enrolls successively in ATA496a, ATA496b, and 

ATA496c. 

up to 6 credits 



43 



ATA497 S.T.D. DOCTORAL PROJECT SEMINAR 

6 credits 
ATA498 LIBRARY USE 

No credit 
ATA499 DOCTORAL PROJECT SUPERVISION 

For S.T.D. and D.Min. (in-ministry) students who have previously regis- 
tered for the maximum number of credit hours allowed for the doctoral 
project. 

No credit 




Stuart Wilson, Lisa Bibby and Ford King 
in front of Simons-Law 

Lynn Johnson and Peter Roest 



Cliff McLeod and Deck Guess 



John Hall and Phil Williams 




44 



ACADEMIC NOTES 



SCHEDULE 



In September 1977 Columbia began to operate on the semester 
system. The academic year is composed of two long semesters of 
fourteen weeks and a short January term of four weeks. During the 
summer the seminary offers a full program of supervised ministry, an 
eight-week course in beginning Greek, and a four-week summer session 
designed for graduate students and ministers interested in continuing 
education. The sequential nature of the curriculum for first degree 
students makes it essential that they begin their work only with the 
summer course in beginning Greek or with the fall term. 

INTRODUCTORY TERM 

An orientation program is required of all entering students during the 
days preceding the regular opening of the seminary in the fall. It offers 
an opportunity for new students to get acquainted with one another and 
with student body leaders and members of the faculty. Tests are ad- 
ministered to help students identify and understand particular strengths 
and deficiencies of preparation for theological instruction. This program 
is without extra expense to the students, except for a charge for board 
and housing. 

Returning students are also required to participate in the introduc- 
tory term, including a de-briefing of the summer supervised ministry or 
intern program, a discussion of procedures for receiving a call to a 
congregation, presbytery relationships, and the like. 

CREDIT VALUATION AND COURSE LOAD 

While the educational progress of the student cannot be ultimately 
measured by the number of credits earned, a system of course valuation 
is necessary to assure balance in the curriculum. Columbia estimates a 
semester credit as approximately 42 to 45 working hours, except for cer- 
tain supervised ministry and clinical programs whose work investment 
is determined by the contract for the particular course. The satisfactory 
completion of a course, however, is determined not by time invested 
but goals and objectives achieved. 

Each student is urged to consult with his or her faculty adviser before 
registering for courses. The maximum number of credits a student in the 
basic degree program may take in the fourteen week terms is 16, unless 
he or she has a B average in which case he or she may take no more 
than 17. In the four-week January term a student may register for no 
more than four credits. 

The M.Div. degree normally requires three full academic years in 
residence, plus a summer term for SM210. The D.Min. (in-sequence) 
degree normally requires three full academic years in residence, a sum- 
mer term for SM210, and a twelve month internship in a ministry setting. 

45 



GRADING 

At the close of each term grades are given according to the following 
system. A grade report is sent to each student and his or her presbytery. 
For A, B, C, and E component students, special and M.T.S. students: 

A excellent, 3 quality points per credit 

B-f- very good, 2.5 quality points per credit 

B good, 2 quality points per credit 

C+ average, 1.5 quality points per credit 

C satisfactory, 1 quality point per credit 

D+ unsatisfactory, 0.5 quality points per credit 

D inferior, quality points per credit 

E conditioned, quality points per credit 

F failure, minus 1 quality point per credit 

C and E component students during their final component may 
choose to take up to six elective credits for H/S/U, with the permission 
of the instructor, if permission is granted at the beginning of the term. 

For D component students: 

H honors for work of exceptionally distinguished quality 

S satisfactory, for work which represents sufficient mas- 

tery of the content of the course to merit recommen- 
dation for graduation 
U unsatisfactory, for work which represents insufficient 

mastery of the content of the course to merit recom- 
mendation for graduation 

For Th.M., S.T.D., and D.Min. (in ministry) students: 
A excellent, 3 quality points per credit 

B good, 2 quality points per credit 

C passing, 1 quality point per credit 

F failure, minus 1 quality point per credit 

Any student who fails to make a C average any term except the first 
places himself/herself on probation for the next term, and if he/she fails 
to bring his/her average up during that term, he/she will be dropped as 
a student. In the event the student's overall average is C or better, he/she 
will be permitted to remain as a student for another term on probation. 

A U may be remedied by (1) further work on the course, (2) re- 
peating the course, (3) taking an elective course relating to the area of 
deficiency. A U given for unexcused late work shall normally require 
additional work. Any student whose work is unsatisfactory will be placed 
on probation, and if he/she fails to show improvement in the next term 
he/she will be dropped as a student. 

Two temporary notations may be given in certain cases. "In-Progress" 
(IP) is used for courses which by design stretch for more than one term. 
"Incomplete" (Inc) is used for late work when a written excuse has been 
approved by the Professor and the Dean of Students. Further provisions 
for the "Incomplete" can be found in the Digest of Rules and Regula- 
tions. Neither temporary notation carries credit. 

46 



GRADUATION HONORS 

M.Div. degree students who have earned at least a 2.60 grade point 
average on course work will, with the approval of the faculty, be awarded 
the degree "with distinction." 

ATTENDANCE 

Each professor has the responsibility of setting attendance require- 
ments for classes according to the nature of the course. All professors 
make known their requirements on the first day of class and notify the 
Dean of Students when, in their judgment, any student fails to meet 
these requirements. 

SENIOR WORSHIP 

Graduating students in the C and E components are required to lead 
worship and preach for the community ordinarily on Tuesday evenings. 
The experience is evaluated by a group of students and faculty. Students 
in the A component give written response to a required number of ser- 
vices as preparation for their work in P141. 

FLEXIBILITY 

Students who have strong backgrounds in certain particular fields of 
the curriculum, or who demonstrate unusual proficiency in their work, 
are given opportunities for special placement or for independent work. 
Requests for flexibility in a student's program should be made to the 
Dean of Academic Affairs. Two opportunities for flexibility are available. 

1. Students may be permitted advanced placement in the A and B 
components if they can satisfactorily demonstrate that they have already 
achieved the objectives of a given course. This means that they may be 
exempt from the course and permitted to take an advanced course in 
the area. 

2. Academically qualified students may be permitted to engage in 
independent study as a route to the establishment of competence in a 
required course. 

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH 

Students are encouraged to design and pursue their own program of 
independent research as a part of the elective offerings. Contracts may 
be drawn up with faculty members teaching in the area of the student's 
interest for reading courses and research projects. The nature and ex- 
tent of the work projected and completed determine the amount of 
credit given. Such courses provide students the opportunity to investi- 
gate areas of specialized interest in which no regular electives are 
offered. 

47 



MASTER OF DIVINITY AND DOCTOR 



A COMPONENT 

Summer 

B021 Essentials of Greek 



Winter 

non-credit HD171 Context of Ministry 

— Elective 



Credits 

2 
2 



Fall 

B151 

HD111 

Pill 



Credits 



Pauline Literature* 5 

Church through Reformation 5 

Becoming a Minister 3 

Elective 2 



15 



Spring 

B152 

HD112 

HD113 

P121 

P141 



Synoptic Gospels* 
Modern Church 
Hist, of Church in U.S. 
Min. of Teaching 
Worship with Preaching 



Credits 

5 
2 
2 
3 
3_ 

15 



A reading knowledge of Greek is a prerequisite for A Component courses in the Biblical area. 



B COMPONENT 



Summer 

SM210 Parish 



Credits Winter Credits 

6 B221 Essentials of Hebrew 4 



Fall 



Credits 



Spring 



B241 


Survey of OT Lit. 


3 


B231 


HD231 


Reformed Theology 


4 


or 


P231 


Ministry of Pastoral Care* 


2 


B232 


SM211 


Hospital* 


3 


HD232 




Pastoral Course* 


2 


HD271 


— 


Electives 


3-6 
15 


P231 
SM211 



Exegesis of Psalms 

Exegesis of Isaiah 1-12 

Reformed Theology 

Christian Ethics 

Ministry of Pastoral Care" 

Hospital* 

Pastoral Course* 

Electives 



Credits 



3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
1-5 

T5~ 



* SM211 and P231 must be taken the same term, either in the fall or spring. 
One other Pastoral Area course must be chosen from either P221 or P241. 



48 



3F MINISTRY (IN-SEQUENCE) PROGRAMS 

For Completion of M.Div. Degree 

(The C Component comes after completion of A and B Components and Admission to Candi- 
dacy.) 

C COMPONENT 



Fall 








Credits 


Spring 




Credits 


B371 


Pref. to 


Bib. 


Theol. 


3 


HD331 


Contemporary Theology 


3 


P311 


Church Structures 


3 


1311 


Ministry of the Church 


5 


SM311 


Urban 






T** 


SM311 


Urban 


T** 




Electives 






6-8 
14 




Electives 


4-6 
14 


Winter 


Elective 






Credits 
4 









** SM311 is offered in the fall and spring but required of the student only one semester. 

Electives in the M.Div. program shall include at least 5 credits in each of the three areas of 
the curriculum, plus 13 undesignated credits. 

For Completion of D.Min. Degree 

(The D and E Components come after completion of A and B Components and Admission to 
Candidacy.) 

D COMPONENT 



SM 411-412-413-414 

P482 

P451 

1402 



Internship (12 months) 
Church Administration (Fall) 
Preaching and Congregation (Spring) 
Evaluation and Ministry Development (Summer) 



Credits 

20 
2 
2 
2 



E COMPONENT 



Fall 




B471 


Pref. to Bib. Theo 


P411 


Church Structures 


1411 


Project Seminar 


— 


Electives 


Winter 




1412 


Project Sem. 



Credits 

3 

3 

2 

6_ 

14 

Credits 
4 



Spring 

HD431 

1413 

1414 



Contemporary Theology 
Project Seminar 
Ministry Seminar 
Electives 



Credits 

3 

2 

3 

6_ 

14 



Electives in the D.Mip. program shall include at least 5 credits in each of the three areas of 
the curriculum, plus 9 undesignated credits. 



49 



ORDINATION EXAMS 

Students who become candidates for ordination in the Presbyterian 
Church U.S. are required to take written examinations administered 
either by the presbytery under which the student is a candidate or the 
presbytery in which he or she expects to accept a call. The written exams 
are in the areas of Bible, theology, the sacraments, and Church polity. 
There is ample opportunity within the regular seminary curriculum to 
take course work preparatory to the exams. 

SUMMER GREEK SCHOOL 

Entering students in the first professional degree program are required 
to have a reading knowledge of New Testament Greek. For those stu- 
dents who are not prepared in Greek the seminary offers a non-credit 
course, B021, during the summer. The course runs for an eight-week 
period and meets each morning, Monday through Friday, for two hours. 
Students wishing to transfer the course to another institution where 
New Testament Greek is accepted for credit can receive six semester 
credits for the course. Students not having successfully completed two 
years of Greek in college and who cannot attend the summer course 
may apply through the Dean of Academic Affairs to take a qualifying 
exam. 

Textbooks for Summer Greek School will be the Greek New Testa- 
ment and Machen's New Testament Creek for Beginners, both of which 
are available from the Columbia Bookstore at a discount. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The Summer Session, a four week period in July and August, is meant 
to provide usual and unusual educational opportunities, combining the 
faculty with invited instructors whose special skills are particularly useful 
to practicing ministers. 

Purposes 

• to offer credit courses for D.Min. (in-ministry) students 

• to provide opportunities for practicing pastors and other ministers 
to engage in continuing education aimed at further development of 
professional skills 

• to assist ministers in assessing their professional skills 

• to provide laity with opportunities for development of skills needed 
in their work in church and world 

• to allow ministers and students to take basic and advanced degree 
courses 

• to provide clergy and laity with opportunities to understand the 
concerns and priorities before the PCUS 

Most courses will take into account the concerns of practicing pro- 
fessionals rather than the needs of students preparing for practice of 
ministry. Discussions, workshops, analysis, projects and learning by ex- 
ploration will be normative. 

For further information write to the Director of the Summer Session. 



GENERAL EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION 

THE JOHN BULOW CAMPBELL LIBRARY 

The Library, an integral part of the teaching program, seeks to extend 
the work of the classroom in breadth and depth, to provide for student 
and faculty research, and to stimulate reading beyond course require- 
ments. The collection numbers more than 90,000 volumes: books, bound 
periodicals, church court records, as well as tapes and cassettes. The 
library is a well-balanced selection of older and more modern critical 
works. Reformation sources include the Calvin and Melanchthon sec- 
tions of the Corpus Reformatorum and the Weimar edition of Luther. 

ATLANTA THEOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION 

Through the Atlanta Theological Association, Columbia enjoys aca- 
demic and professsional affiliations with Candler School of Theology, 
Erskine Theological Seminary, and Interdeminominational Theological 
Center, and with the Georgia Association for Pastoral Care and the 
Urban Training Organization of Atlanta. The Association develops and 
coordinates educational programs and resources of these member insti- 
tutions, which include approximately 800 students, 85 faculty, and 
600,000 volumes. (Students and scholars also have access to the holdings 
of sixteen libraries in the Atlanta-Athens area which comprise the Uni- 
versity Center in Georgia.) Among significant and promising cooperative 
endeavors are, in addition to the Doctor of Sacred Theology and Doctor 
of Ministry (in-ministry) degree programs, cross registration, sharing of 
faculty, library and lectureship resources, interseminary courses and ex- 
perimental programs in various academic disciplines and professional 
specializations. 

LECTURES 

Each year two significant lectureships are sponsored at Columbia. 
One is the Thomas Smyth Foundation Lectures, begun through a bequest 
of the Rev. Thomas Smyth, pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church of 
Charleston, S. C. from 1831 to 1873. Since 1911 distinguished scholars 
from the United States and abroad have presented lectures on a variety 
of themes and issues. Recent Smyth Lectures have been Dr. John Bright, 
Dr. Jaroslav Pelikan, and Dr. Austin C. Lovelace. 

Another series, the Alumni/ae Lectures, brings to the campus theo- 
logians and ministers who address the seminary community, graduates, 
and interested pastors during the annual Columbia Forum. Recent speak- 
ers have been Dr. Wallace M. Alston, Jr. and Dr. John H. Leith. 

AWARDS AND PRIZES 

Through the gifts of alumni and friends of the seminary several 
prizes and awards have been established to recognize outstanding aca- 
demic achievements by first professional degree students. 

The Wilds Book Prize, initially established by Louis T. Wilds of 
Columbia, South Carolina, provides a cash award to the graduating 
student selected by the faculty for the highest distinction in his or her 
academic work over the entire seminary program. 

51 



The Lyman and Myki Mobley Prize in Biblical Scholarship has been 
established in memory of Donald Lyman Mobley (CT$, class of 1977) 
and Myki Powell Mobley (Candler School of Theology, class of 1977). It 
is given each year to the student or faculty member doing exemplary 
work in the field of Biblical scholarship as it relates to the worship and 
work of the Church. 

The Paul T. Fuhrmann Book Prize in Church History was established 
in 1962 by an alumnus of the Seminary to honor the late Dr. Paul T. 
Fuhrmann, former Professor of Church History. The award is made an- 
nually to the student who has shown the most outstanding achievement 
in Church History. 

The Florrie Wilkes Sanders Prize in Theology is given by the family 
of Florrie Wilkes Sanders of Atlanta, Georgia. It is awarded each year to 
the student presenting the best paper showing sound theological schol- 
arship and relevance to the needs of Christian people in the contempo- 
rary world. Special attention is given to the papers relating theology to 
the education, professions and avocations of lay people. 

The Emma Gaillard Boyce Memorial Award is made annually by the 
Rev. David Boyce, an alumnus of the seminary, in honor of his mother, 
a devoted music teacher, choir director, church musician and minis- 
ter's wife. It is awarded to the student writing the best paper on the 
creative use of music in worship. 

Two Abdullah Awards are given each year by the Rev. Gabriel 
Abdullah, an alumnus of the seminary. One is given for the best paper 
setting forth a plan for the teaching of Bible in the public schools; the 
second for the best paper designing a program for the development of 
moral and spiritual values in the public schools. 

The Indiantown Church Award was established by the family of Mr. 
and Mrs. R. W. Stuckey in their honor to highlight the work of ministry 
in churches in rural areas. The prize is awarded annually to a student 
who has done outstanding work in the summer in a rural ministry. 

GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

The Seminary awards each year one or more fellowships to outstand- 
ing graduates completing the M.Div. or D.Min. (in-sequence) degree. The 
purpose of these fellowships is to recognize superior intellectual 
achievement demonstrated during the course of the regular seminary 
program and to provide a modest support for graduate work beyond 
the first professional degree. They must be used toward an accredited 
doctoral graduate degree program in which the recipient engages in 
the scholarly pursuit of an academic theological discipline. 

The Fannie Jordan Bryan Fellowships were established through a 
generous legacy left to Columbia Theological Seminary by the late Mrs. 
Fannie Jordan Bryan of Columbia, South Carolina. The Alumni/ae Fellow- 
ships were initiated by the Senior Class of 1941 and continue to be 
funded through the operating expense budget of the seminary. The 
Anna Church Whitner Memorial Fellowships are given periodically from 
a legacy left to the seminary in 1928 by the late William C. Whitner, 
of Rock Hill, S.C., in memory of his mother. 

52 



CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION 

Clinical pastoral education is a first-hand learning experience under 
certified supervision which provides theological students and pastors 
with opportunities for intensive study of pastoral relationships, and 
which seeks to make clear in understanding and practice the resources, 
methods, and meanings of the Christian faith as expressed through pas- 
toral care. Columbia's membership in the Association for Clinical Pas- 
toral Education means that its students will be given priority of choice 
in institutions elected, especially those listed within the Southeast 
Region. 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

On its own campus Columbia has video taping facilities. Video tap- 
ing is used in a variety of ways in classroom instruction and in preaching 
practicums. Columbia's facilities also allow limited work in experimen- 
tation with television production. 

NATIONAL CAPITAL SEMESTER FOR SEMINARIANS 

Columbia Seminary is a participating institution in the National 
Capital Semester for Seminarians, organized by Wesley Theological Semi- 
nary, Washington, D. C. The program provides an opportunity for 
seminary students to spend a semester in Washington for study and 
involvement in the processes of government and the concerns of the 
churches. The design includes an interaction/reflection seminar, super- 
vised study, and the opportunity to elect other courses in Washington 
institutions. For detailed information, see the Dean of Academic Affairs. 

ALUMNI/AE ASSOCIATION 

Columbia's alumni/ae hold their annual meeting in late January on 
the Seminary campus. During the week stimulating presentations on 
ministry are offered, classes hold yearly reunions, the Alumni/ae Council 
and officers are elected and retiring professors are honored. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

In addition to the summer session and special courses in the January 
term, several workshops and seminars are held each year as continuing 
education offerings for ministers. These events, ordinarily non-credit, 
provide opportunities for both academic and professional growth. At 
any time in the year when space is available ministers can come to the 
Seminary for independent study. Library facilities can be arranged for 
research, and consultation with faculty is encouraged. 

COLUMBIA FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE 

Columbia Friendship Circle (CFC) is an association of more than 
5,000 women throughout the PCUS who assist the Seminary in three 
ways: by praying for the Seminary and telling its story in their local 
areas; by encouraging young men and women to consider the ministry 
and Columbia Seminary; and by providing financial assistance to the 
Seminary each year by supporting a particular project. During the past 
several years CFC has raised over $25,000 each year to support such 
projects as Supervised Ministry and Scholarship Aid for students. 

53 



STUDENT INFORMATION 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

The approximate cost for educating each student for a year is $6,000. 
However, synods' benevolence gifts, gifts from churches, friends, and 
alumni/ae, and income from endowed funds make possible the following 
expenses which are charged to students: 

Tuition 

Per semester credit $ 60.00 

Ten credits or more 600.00 

Winter Term of 4 credits 240.00 

Summer Language School 320.00 

Audit fee per semester credit 30.00 
D.Min program fee 

(payable at the end of the first full term of work) 500.00 

Full academic year, excluding summer language school 1440.00 

Board 

Fall or spring term 350.00 

Winter term 135.00 

Summer Language School 200.00 

Full academic year, excluding summer school 835.00 

Room 

Single student, fall or spring term 200.00 

Single student, winter term 65.00 

Single student, summer language school 120.00 

Suite, fall or spring term 280.00 

Suite, winter term 90.00 

Suite, summer language school 140.00 
Apartments and houses, per month 85.00 to 150.00 

Full academic year for single student 465.00 
excluding summer language school 

Supervised Ministry Fees 

SM211, SM311, per semester 50.00 

SM210, per summer 250.00 

SM411-414, per twelve-month period 1000.00 

SM610, SM615, per semester 360.00 

Other Fees 

Diploma 20.00 

Thesis binding 6.00 

Application 15.00 

ST.D. Continuation/Library Use Fee, per year 150.00 

All fees are payable on the first day of the term, or during the term by 
special arrangement only. Fees listed for room and board are subject 
to change. 

54 



OTHER EXPENSES 

Each student is required to have some form of hospitalization insur- 
ance acceptable to the faculty. Students may purchase the group insur- 
ance which is normally offered to the student body or they may purchase 
insurance through other sources. 

The amount of money needed for books, travel, recreation and inci- 
dental expenses will vary according to the habits of the student. A book- 
store is operated on campus and students receive discounts on pur- 
chases made there. 

REFUND POLICY 

During the fall term students withdrawing from seminary before 
the end of the first week of classes qualify for full credit on tuition fees. 
Students withdrawing from seminary before the end of the fifth week of 
classes in the fall or spring terms, or before the end of the first week 
of classes in the winter term, qualify for one-half credit on tuition fees. 
No refunds, or credits are made on room charges. 

HOUSING 

Unmarried Students 

Dormitory housing is available for unmarried students. Most of the 
rooms are for single occupancy, many of them have connecting baths. 
All rooms are fully furnished with the exception of linens. Laundry 
facilities are provided. 

Married Students Without Children 

Suites of two rooms with private bath are available for married stu- 
dents without children. These suites are fully furnished with the ex- 
ception of linens. Laundry facilities are provided. There are no facilities 
for cooking. 

Married Students With Children 

One, two, and three bedroom unfurnished apartments are available 
for married students with children. The rent for these apartments is from 
$85 to $150 per month depending on the size of the apartment. Appli- 
cations for apartments should be made as early as possible following ac- 
ceptance. 

All inquiries for housing should be directed to the Business Office. 

COLUMBIA FELLOWSHIPS 

Qualified men and women planning to attend seminary or seeking to 
explore the possibility of entering the ministry may apply for a Columbia 
Fellowship for study at Columbia Theological Seminary. These fellow- 
ships are for persons who have shown significant academic and leader- 

55 



ship abilities during their undergraduate study. The fellowships are for 
one academic year only. 

To be eligible applicants must be citizens of the United States or 
Canada. They must have received a bachelor's degree not more than 
three years prior to the application or have academic standing as a gradu- 
ating senior. The fellowships will be awarded to persons having high aca- 
demic achievement and leadership abilities. A personal interview is re- 
quired. 

All recipients are required to enroll full-time for one academic year 
at Columbia Seminary. 

Up to five awards will be made for full room, board, tuition and fees. 
If a recipient receives another scholarship an appropriate adjustment will 
be made in the stipend of the Columbia Fellowship. 

Application for a Columbia Fellowship is made through the Office of 
Admissions at Columbia Seminary. Selection is made by the Columbia 
Seminary faculty on the recommendation of the Selection Committee. 
Applications must be received no later than March 15. Announcement 
of the awards will be made on April 15. 

All those applying for a Columbia Fellowship will automatically be 
considered for regular admission and financial aid if they are not awarded 
a Fellowship. 

THE COLUMBIA BOOKSTORE 

The Seminary Bookstore, located in the Student Center, provides 
books, materials, and supplies at a 10% discount for students to begin 
collecting for their own theological library and for persons working 
toward advance degrees to continue that process. The Bookstore also 
serves pastors, laypersons, and churches all over the Southeast. Its inven- 
tory includes a wide selection of standard and current books in the His- 
torical-Doctrinal Area, the Pastoral Area, and in Bible and Homelitics, 
including many commentaries on the Old and New Testament and many 
on worship and liturgy. 

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Columbia Seminary offers financial assistance to many students each 
year. This assistance is available to first professional degree students 
and is based upon need. 

Students applying for financial assistance complete a form giving their 
estimated income and expenses. The estimated expenses are figured 
according to norms establishd by a Columbia Seminary student-faculty 
committee. After financial need is calculated, aid is provided in the form 
of work scholarships and grants. Most students who come to Columbia 
Seminary without a large indebtedness find that they can complete their 
Seminary education without crippling financial worries. 

Financial aid awarded for the 1976-77 academic year ranged from 
$200 to $2950 depending upon need and family size. Maximum grants 

56 



were $1800 for single students, $2200 for married students without 
children, and $2950 for married students with three or more children. 

Students interested in more detailed information about the financial 
assistance offered by Columbia Seminary should request from the Dean 
of Students' Office the "Columbia Theological Seminary Memorandum 
on Financial Aid/' following acceptance. 

Veterans Administration Benefits 

Certification for V. A. benefits is handled through the Office of the 
Dean of Students. 




John Stuhl and Professor McDill 




^T" 


""PJF 




.L^jfc. 


P P 


~*"*j#" 








H5r«5 



Inside Library 



57 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Student Co-ordinating Council 

The Student Co-ordinating Council was established to initiate discus- 
sion and decisions within the student body, to respond to the needs of 
the student community, and to co-ordinate student and community ac- 
tivities. It represents the interests of the entire seminary community, i.e., 
students on and off campus, families of students, and all members of 
the seminary community. 

Society for Missionary Inquiry 

This society was founded in 1832 and has been an instrument through 
the years to promote an active interest in missions among the student 
body and throughout the Church. The society regularly brings outstand- 
ing speakers before the student body and for years sponsored a Mis- 
sions Conference at Rock Eagle, Georgia. Through the work of the 
society a number of students have responded to the challenge of in- 
ternational missions. 

Society for Theological Scholarship 

This society was established for the purpose of encouraging in every 
student the highest possible scholarship in all departments of instruc- 
tion. Membership is open to all students and faculty on a voluntary basis. 
Lectures, informal discussions with visiting lecturers, symposia by mem- 
ber of the faculty, and other meetings are sponsored in the interest of 
Christian scholarship. 

Women of Columbia 

This organization is for all the women of the Columbia Community. 
Women students, wives of male students, faculty wives, and other wo- 
men in the community meet together for study and the sharing of mu- 
tual concerns and interests. The Women of Columbia sponsor a number 
of events for the whole community as well as special programs of par- 
ticular interest to women. 

Student Supply Preaching 

Columbia Seminary, through the Office of the Dean of Students, 
works with Presbyteries and local congregations in making arrange- 
ments for student supply preaching. Students are generally assigned on 
a rotating basis to churches that have requested supply ministers. 

PLEDGE 

Students entering Columbia Theological Seminary are required by the 
Seminary's Plan of Government to take the pledge given below. This 
pledge was first taken by students at Princeton Seminary around 1817 
and continues in use today in most Presbyterian Seminaries. 

The language in many ways is archaic, but it still points to the basic 

58 



responsibilities of a student. The way in which the pledge is interpreted 
at Columbia Seminary can be seen by reference to the mimeographed 
"Digest of Information and Regulations." 

Deeply impressed with the importance of improving in knowl- 
edge, piety, and prudence, preparatory to the Gospel Ministry, I 
solemnly promise, in reliance on Divine grace, that I will faithfully 
and diligently attend all the assigned instructions of this Seminary, 
and that I will conscientiously and vigilantly observe all the rules 
and regulations specified in the Plan of Government, obey all law- 
ful requisitions, and readily yield to all the wholesome admoni- 
tions of the President and Professors of the Seminary while I con- 
tinue a student in it. 

COMMUNITY WORSHIP 

The seminary community gathers for worship every day of regular 
classes to express its thanksgiving for and need of God's grace in the 
church and in the world. 




Student Co-ordinating Council 



59 



ADMINISTRATION 

J. Davison Philips, Ph.D President 

Secretary to the President: Peggy M. Rowland 

Charles B. Cousar, Ph.D Dean of Academic Affairs 

Secretary: Margaret G. Cogswell 

James DuPre Newsome, Jr., Ph.D Director of Advanced Studies 

Secretary: Barbara C. Cheney 

Jasper N. Keith, B.D Associate Professor of Supervised Ministry 

Secretary: Ann A. Titshaw 

T. Erskine Clarke, Th.D Dean of Students 

Secretary: Betty W. Davis 

F. Sidney Anderson, Th.M Business Manager and Treasurer 

Secretary and Financial Officer: Betty M. Cason 
Bookkeeper: Margaret M. McDonald 
Receptionist: Betty P. Stringer 

A. Cecil Moore, Jr., B.D Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 

Marie Alexander Food Service Manager 

Carlisle C. Harvard, B.A Bookstore Manager 

Harold B. Prince, M.A., M.L Professor of Bibliography; Librarian 

Lillian M. Taylor, Ed.S Director of Library Operations 

Assistant Librarian: Esther C. H. Hung 
Library Assistant: Ann M. Taylor 

Richard A. Dodds, Th.M Director of Seminary Relations 

Secretary: Mildred G. Berry 
Secretary: Elizabeth B. Burgess 

Harry H. Barrow, M.Div Associate Director of Seminary Relations 

and Director of Admissions 
Secretary: Rosemary M. Bennett 

Department of Pastoral Care 

Administrative Assistant: Marie L. Nickle 

H. Milton Gardiner, S.T.D Director of Graduate Professional 

Studies, Atlanta Theological Association 

Administrative Assistant: Elizabeth A. Jones 

60 




i 



*W 



% 





F. Sidney Anderson, Th.M. 

Business Manager and 

Treasurer 



Richard A. Dodds, Th.M. 

Director of 

Seminary Relations 



Henry H. Barrow , M.Div 

Associate Director 

of Seminary Relations 

Director of Admissions 





H. Milton Gardiner, S.T.D. 

Director. Graduate 
Professional Studies, A TA 



Lillian Taylor, Ed.S. 

Director of Library 

Operations 







Cecil Moore, B.D. 

Superintendent 

Buildings and Grounds 



Carlisle C. Harvard, B.A 

Bookstore Manager 



Marie A lexander 
Food Service Manager 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

J. Erskine Love, Jr Chairman 

The Rev. John H. Law Vice-Chairman 

The Rev. F. Sidney Anderson Treasurer 

The Rev. J. Edward Craig Secretary 

Peggy M. Rowland Assistant Secretary 

Term to Expire 1978 

Mary Ellen Alexander Long Beach, Mississippi 

The Rev. J. Edward Craig Orangeburg, South Carolina 

Dr. Merle W. Fowler Paducah, Kentucky 

The Rev. Richard T. Harbison Pensacola, Florida 

The Rev. W. Frank Harrington Atlanta, Georgia 

Robert E. Lee Pensacola, Florida 

J. Erskine Love, Jr Atlanta, Georgia 

W. Tom Neal Brewton, Alabama 

Edward P. Perrin Spartanburg, South Carolina 

The Rev. Robert S. Smith Daytona Beach, Florida 

Term to Expire 1979 

The Rev. Cecil D. Brearley, Jr Columbia, South Carolina 

The Rev. Paul M. Edris Daytona Beach, Florida 

Myron Gibbons Tampa, Florida 

The Rev. James V. Johnson, Jr Columbus, Georgia 

The Rev. P. Randolph Kowalski Greenville, South Carolina 

Champney A. McNair Atlanta, Georgia 

Frank Mitchener, Jr Sumner, Mississippi 

Thomas E. Rast Birmingham, Alabama 

The Rev. John H. Sadler Huntsville, Alabama 

Deedie Simmons Jacksonville, Florida 

Term to Expire 1980 

Ralph H. Birdsong Atlanta, Georgia 

The Rev. John H. LaMotte Sarasota, Florida 

The Rev. John H. Law Dalton, Georgia 

The Rev. Charles R. McCain Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

W. Sloan McCrea Miami, Florida 

The Rev. J. Phillips Noble Charleston, South Carolina 

Eugene F. Rogers Columbia, South Carolina 

William F. Winter Jackson, Mississippi 

Emily C. Wood Maitland, Florida 

The Rev. Frederick Z. Woodward Signal Mountain, Tennessee 

62 



COMMITTEES OF 
Columbia 

Investment 

H. Talmage Dobbs, Chairman 

William A. Adams 

F. Sidney Anderson 

Ralph H. Birdsong 

J. Erskine Love, Jr. 

J. Davison Philips 

J. McDowell Richards 

Executive 

J. Erskine Love, Jr., Chairman 
John H. Law, Vice Chairman 
J. Edward Craig, Secretary 
Frederick Z. Woodward 
Champney A. McNair 
W. Frank Harrington 
J. Phillips Noble 
Thomas E. Rast 

Academic Affairs 

J. Phillips Noble, Chairman 
Mary Ellen Alexander 
James V. Johnson, Jr. 
Robert E. Lee 
Charles R. McCain 
Frank Mitchener 
Robert S. Smith 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Theological Seminary 
1977-78 

Planning and Development 

Thomas E. Rast, Chairman 

Paul M. Edris 

Myron Gibbons 

W. Frank Harrington 

P. Randolph Kowalski 

W. Tom Neal 

Emily Wood 

Business Affairs 

Champney A. McNair, Chairman 

Ralph H. Birdsong 

John H. LaMotte 

John H. Law 

W. Sloan McCrea 

Edward P. Perrin 

Eugene F. Rogers 

William F. Winter 

Student Life and Work 

Frederick Z. Woodward, Chairman 

Cecil D. Brearley, Jr. 

J. Edward Craig 

Merle W. Fowler 

Richard T. Harbison 

John H. Sadler 

Deedie Simmons 




The Board of Directors 



63 



y <t<>4 



*A 



W<>W inihl 




FACULTY 



JAMES DAVISON PHILIPS, Ph.D. 

President 

A.B., Hampden-Sydney College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; D.D., Presbyterian College; 

Hampden-Sydney College 





HUBERT VANCE TAYLOR, Ph.D. 

Professor of Public Speech and Music 

A.B., Lafayette College; B.Mus., Westminster Choir College; B.D., Columbia 

Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern University 




HAROLD BAILEY PRINCE, M.A., M.L 

Professor of Bibliography; Librarian 

A.B., M.A., University of South Carolina; M.L., Emory University; 

B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 







THOMAS HALDANE McDILL, M.A. 

Professor of Pastoral Theology and Counseling 

A.B., Erskine College; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; M.A. 

University of Chicago; D.Lit, Presbyterian College 



JAMES HERBERT GAILEY, JR., Th.D. 

Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature, and Exegesis 

A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., 

ThD., Princeton Theological Seminary 






tk *m 



SHIRLEY CAPERTON GUTHRIE, JR. D.Theol. 

/. B. Green Professor of Systematic Theology 

A.B., Austin College; B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; D.Theol., 

University of Basel 



WADE PRICHARD HUIE, JR., Ph.D. 

Peter Marshall Professor of Homiletics 

A.B., Emory University; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary, Ph.D., 

University of Edinburgh 





LUDWIG RICHARD MAX DEVVITZ, Ph.D. 

Professor of Old Testament Language, Literature and Exegesis 

B.D., University of London; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 



CHARLES BLANTON COUSAR, Ph.D. 
Dean of Academic Affairs; Samuel A. Cartledge Professor of 

New Testament 

Language, Literature, and Exegesis 

A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

University of Aberdeen 





J. WILL ORMOND, Ph.D. 

/. McDowell Richards Professor of Biblical Exposition 

A.B., University of Alabama; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; Th.M., 

Princeton Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Glasgow; 

D.D., Southwestern at Memphis 



THERON S. NEASE, Ph.D. 

Professor of Pastoral Theology and Counseling 

A.B., Austin College; B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 

Princeton Theological Seminary 





%a 



G BENTON KLINE, JR., Ph.D. 

Professor of Theology 

A.B., College of Wooster; B.D., Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., Yale University 



A.B. 



KEITH F. NICKLE, D.Theol. 

Professor of New Testament 

University of Texas; B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological 

Seminary; D. Theol., University of Basel 





CATHERINE GUNSALUS GONZALEZ, Ph.D. 
Professor of Church History 

B.A., Beaver College; S.T.B., Boston University School of Theology; 
Ph.D., Boston University. 



B.S. 



FREDERICK OTTO BONKOVSKY, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Christian Ethics 

Muskingum College; M.Div., Yale Divinity School; Certificate, Free 

University, Berlin; Ph.D., Harvard University 




£S 




THOMAS ERSKINE CLARKE, Th.D. 

Dean of Students 

A.B., University of South Carolina; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Th.M, Th.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia. 



JASPER NEWTON KEITH, JR., B.D. 
Associate Professor of Supervised Ministry 

A.B., Mercer University; B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Certified Supervisor, Association for Clinical Pastoral Education; Candidate 

for S.T.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 




OSCAR J. HUSSEL, Ed.D. 

Associate Professor of Christian Education 

B.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia University 




A.B. 



JAMES D. NEWSOME, JR., Ph.D. 

Director of Advanced Studies 

Millsaps College; B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 




ADJUNCT FACULTY 

HARRY MILTON GARDINER, S.T.D. 

Director, Atlanta Theological Association, Adjunct Professor of 

Church Ministry 

A.B., Th.B., Northwest Nazarene College; M.Div., Nazarene Theological Seminary; 
S.T.D. , San Francisco Theological Seminary. 

lillian Mcculloch taylor, e<±s. 

Director of Library Operations 

B.A., Queens College; M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian Education; 
M.S. (L.S.), George Peabody College; Ed.S., George Peabody College. 



VISITING INSTRUCTORS 

WILLIAM VAN ARNOLD, Th.D. 

Associate Professor of Pastoral Counseling, Union Theological Seminary 

in Virginia 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

EDGAR M. GRIDER, B.D. 

Director, Urban Training Organization of Atlanta 
A.B., Princeton University; B.D., Yale University Divinity School 

ROBERT THORNTON HENDERSON, B.D. 

Staff Associate for Evangelism, Ceneral Assembly Mission Board; 
A.B., Davidson College; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 

BETTYE VIRGINIA KILLGORE, B.R.E. 

Christian Educator for Northeast Cluster of Presbyterian Churches, 
Atlanta Presbytery 
Texas Christian University; B.R.E., Presbyterian School of Christian Education 

THOMAS GRIER LONG, M.Div. 

Assistant Professor of Ministry, Erskine Theological Seminary 

A.B., Erskine College; M.Div., Erskine Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Candidate, 

Princeton Theological Seminary 

KENNETH F. MORRIS, Th.D. 

Professor of New Testament, Erskine Theological Seminary 

A.B., Erskine College; B.D., Erskine Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton Theological 

Seminary; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia. 

DAVID H. MOYLAN, Th.M. 

Director of The Decatur-DeKalb Pastoral Counseling Center; 

B.S., Davidson College; M.Div., Th.M., Union Theological Seminary in Virginia. 

JOHN H. PATTON, Ph.D. 

Executive Director, The Georgia Association for Pastoral Care, Inc.; 

A.B., Emory University; B.D., Candler School of Theology; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

69 



PROFESSORS EMERITI 



james Mcdowell Richards, d.d., lld. 

President Emeritus 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Princeton University; A.B., M.A., Oxford University; 
B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; D.D., Davidson College; LLD., King College. 

MANFORD GEORGE GUTZKE, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

A.B., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., Columbia University; 

D.D., Austin College 



WILLIAM CHILDS ROBINSON, Th.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

A.B., Roanoke College; M.A., University of South Carolina; B.D., Columbia Theological 
Seminary; Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard University; 
D.D., Roanoke College. 



FELIX BAYARD GEAR, Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus 

A.B., Davis and Elkins College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of Edinburgh; D.D., Davis and Elkins College. 

SAMUEL ANTOINE CARTLEDGE, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

A.B., M.A., University of Georgia; B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

DEAN GREER McKEE, Th.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

A.B., Parsons College; S.T.B., S.T.M., and Th.D., The Biblical Seminary; 

D.D., Parsons College. 

JACK BRAME McMICHAEL, Ed.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

A.B., East Texas State Teachers College; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; 

Ed.D., Columbia University. 

RONALD STEWART WALLACE, Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus 

B.Sc, M.A., Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 



70 



ADJUNCT PROFESSORS IN SUPERVISED MINISTRY 



CLINICAL PASTORAL EDUCATION SUPERVISORS 



William P. Boyle, B.D., Th.M. 
Dean C. Bridges, M.Div. 
Donald H. Cabaniss, B.D., M.Ed. 
William Emerson, B.D. 
G. Robert Gary, M.Div. 
C. Fred Hall, B.D. 
Timothy Little, S.T.M. 



Dan A. McRight, M.Div. 
David H. Moylan, Th.M. 
John H. Patton, Ph.D. 
Ronald Stephenson, M.Div. 
E. Augustus Verdery, Th.D. 
Frank Weathersby, D.Min. 
Joseph W. Whitwell, B.D. 



URBAN TRAINING ORGANIZATION OF ATLANTA 



Edgar M. Grider, B.D. 
Charles G. Helms, M.Div. 



Calvin E. Houston, B.D. 
Vern E. McCarty, B.D. 



SUPERVISING PASTORS FOR SUMMER ASSISTANTS 



The Rev. Robert L. Ashworth The Rev. 

The Rev. Juventino R. Ballesteros The Rev. 

The Rev. T. H. Beasley, Jr. The Rev. 

The Rev. C. Charles Benz, Jr. The Rev. 

The Rev. Robert K. Bondurant The Rev. 

The Rev. John C. Boyer The Rev. 

The Rev. William T. Bryant The Rev. 

The Rev. R. Alan Chapman The Rev. 

The Rev. William R. Conine, Jr. The Rev. 

The Rev. Archie Davis The Rev. 

The Rev. Thomas M. Dews The Rev. 

The Rev. M. McCoy Franklin The Rev. 

The Rev. John A. Graham The Rev. 

The Rev. Wayne D. Griffin The Rev. 

The Rev. John R. Hall The Rev. 

The Rev. David L. Hare The Rev. 

The Rev. Basil V. Hicks The Rev. 

The Rev. Z. N. Holler The Rev. 

The Rev. Charles Home The Rev. 

The Rev. J. Trent Howell, Jr. The Rev. 

SUPERVISING PASTORS FOR INTERNS 



Robert F. Hunt 
Robert F. Inman 
Ervin R. Joslin 
Charles E. Kirkpatrick 
Robert E. Kribbs 
George W. Long 
Frank Masserano 
Ralph E. McCaskill, Jr 
Park H. Moore, Jr. 
Terrence N. Mulford 
Mills J. Peebles 
Harry W. Philips 
Everett H. Phillips 
W. Robert Pollard 
Tom Rogers 
William F. Shouse 
Carl D. Smith 
Bert C. Swearingen 
Donald D. Wade 
Lawrence A. Wood 



The Rev. H. Alan Elmore 
The Rev. Robert E. Malsbary 
The Rev. Robert H. Ramey 



The Rev. Friedrich Schilling 
The Rev. Roy E. Watkins, Jr. 



71 



GRADUATING CLASS OF 1977 



DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY 
Charles Edward Swann 

DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (In-Ministry) 



Joseph Wilson Berry 
John Wesley Bressler 
Marling Elliott 
Gerald Paul Jenkins 
William Ross Johnston 
Philip Wayne Leftwich 



Eugene Barclay Norris 
Jean William Stonebraker 
James Osgood Watkins, Jr. 
Frank Douglas Weathersby 
Richard Scott Woodmansee 



DOCTOR OF MINISTRY (In-Sequence) 



Shirley Ford-Adams 
Kenneth Alva Brown 
Daniell Carl Hamby 
Robert Ernest MacKay 

MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Scobie Clovis Branson 
Yll Bong Lee 
Hyung-Ku Park 

MASTER OF DIVINITY 

Thomas Ross Atkins 
Robert Clay Camenisch 
Harrell Lamar Cobb 
Homer LeGrand Dempsey 
James Henderson Foil, Jr. 
Steve Louis Grimes 
with distinction 
Jeffrey Herbert Hale 
Lewis Ewing Holmes 
Alice Arthur Johnson 
Louis Richard Lothman 



Leonard Gilbert McLaurin 
Donald Lyman Mobley 
Gordon Fitzhugh West, III 



Jan McAfee Rhodes 

John Morria Arnott Thomson 



William Leslie Love 
George Jacob Mahida 
Dennis Arthur Maxey 
William Everett Mills, Jr. 
Marion Thomas Norwood, Jr. 

with distinction 
John Thomas Phillips 
Charles Lincoln Taylor 
Jack Lochridge Taylor 
John Gordon Williams 
Lorenzo Arthur Woolverton 



MASTER OF THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 
Stevan Alan Snipes 

CERTIFICATE 
Harry Langley Stiltz 



72 



AWARDS AND PRIZES — 1977 

FANNIE JORDAN BRYAN FELLOWSHIP: Steve Louis Grimes 

ALUMNI/AE FELLOWSHIP: Marion Thomas Norwood, Jr. 

WILDS BOOK PRIZE: Steve Louis Grimes 

PAUL T. FUHRMAN BOOK PRIZE IN CHURCH HISTORY: 

Peter Rene Roest 

FLORRIE WILKES SANDERS PRIZE IN THEOLOGY: 

Joanna Moseley Adams 

EMMA GAILLARD BOYCE MEMORIAL AWARD: Daniell Carl Hamby 




Professor James Gailey 



Professor Catherine Gonzalez 



73 




Susan and Richard Brooks in their Simons-Law apartment 



The Village housing 




74 



1977-78 ROLL OF STUDENTS 
ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS 



DOCTOR OF SACRED THEOLOGY 



Shirley Ford Adams 
Dunwoody, Georgia 

William Alexander Crosland 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Charles Gordon Helms 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Robert Eugene Johnston 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Jasper Newton Keith, Jr. 
Tucker, Georgia 

Calvin W. Kropp 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.F.A., University of Georgia 

D.Min., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Davidson College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Davidson College 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary in 
New York 

B.A., Davidson College 
B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Mercer University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., M.B.A., Northwestern University 
B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 



DOCTOR OF MINISTRY 

Henry E. Acklen 

Collierville, Tennessee 



Robert L. Ashworth 
Tucker, Georgia 



Sidney Taylor Ayer, Jr. 
Rockmart, Georgia 

John David Beal 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Joseph Franklin Beard 
Lithonia, Georgia 

Donald Louis Bell 
Alexander City, Alabama 



B.A., Austin College 
B.D., Austin Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Mercer University 

B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Emory University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., William Jewell College 
M.Div., Midwestern Baptist Seminary 
M.R.E., New Orleans Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Erskine College 

B.D., Erskine Theological Seminary 

B.A., Baylor University 

B.D., Southeastern Seminary 

Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 



75 



Wade Hampton Bell, Jr. 
Panama City, Florida 

Roe Maxwell Callaway, Jr. 
Valdosta, Georgia 

Norman Campbell, Jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 

Georges Paul Carillet 
Lawrenceville, Georgia 

Clyde Edwin Chase 
Macon, Georgia 

Somchart Cha-umthong 
Bangkok, Thailand 

Monty Carl Clendenin 
Tecumseh, Oklahoma 



Curtis James Cofield 
Montgomery, Alabama 



Anthony Wayne Dean 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

Wiliam Joseph DeLay 
Peachtree City, Georgia 

Charles Lindsey Donneil 
Albany, Georgia 

Joseph Cromer Eckstine 
Macon, Georgia 

Hugh Lee Eichelberger, Jr. 
Asheville, North Carolina 

Franklin Maynard Fetner 
Roanoke, Alabama 

Harvey A. Fincher 
Norcross, Georgia 

Wayne David Griffin 
Gainesville, Florida 



B.A., Brown University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Atlanta Christian College 
M.Div., Emmanuel School of Religion 

B.A., Emory University 
M.Div., Yale Divinity School 

B.A., Silliman University 
B.D., Silliman Divinity School 

B.A., Dallas Baptist College 
M.Div., Southwestern Baptist 
Theological Seminary 

B.C.S., University of Nebraska at 

Omaha 
M.B.A., Sul Ross University 
M.Div., Interdenominational 

Theological Center 

A.B., Mercer University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Baylor University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., University of North Carolina 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary 
Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Florence State University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

B.A., University of Louisville 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Florida Atlantic University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 



76 



William Edward Hammond 
Atlanta, Georgia 

R. Michael Holmes 
Pueblo, Colorado 

Stephen M. Huntley, Jr. 
Kingstree, South Carolina 

Donald J. Jansen 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Troy Gaines Jarvis 
Big Springs, Texas 

Donald Marion Kea 
Albany, Georgia 

John W. Larson 
Amory, Mississippi 

Yll Bong Lee 
Seoul, Korea 



Herbert Lawrence Marbury 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Norman L. Martin 
Atlanta, Georgia 

James Donald Mason 
Hueytown, Alabama 



Wood row McKay, Jr. 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Billy Rex Moorer 

Montgomery, Alabama 



A.B., Mercer University 
B.D., Th. M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Houghton College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Davidson College 
M.Div., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Hope College 
M.A., Western Michigan University 
M.Div., Western Theological Seminary 
Ed.S., Georgia State University 

B.A., Austin College 
M.Div., Austin Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Emory University 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Soong Jun University 

M.A., Korea University 

M.Div., Grand Rapids Theological 

Seminary 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Morehouse College 

B.D., Interdenominational Theological 

Center 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., West Georgia College 
Th.M., New Orleans Baptist 
Theological Seminary 

A.B., Samford University 
M.A., University of Alabama 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Davidson College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., Harding College 

M.A., Harding Graduate School of 

Religion 
M.R.E., Th.M., Alabama Christian 

College of Biblical Studies 



77 



Daniel M. Munn 
Augusta, Georgia 



David William Nash 
Ft. Oglethorpe, Georgia 

Jefferson Davis Norman, II 
Taylorsville, Georgia 



George Harvey Porter, Jr. 
Hapeville, Georgia 



Samuel D. Reeves 

Lithia Springs, Georgia 

Joseph Alvin Scharer 
Plantation, Florida 

Byron Johnson Scott, Jr. 
Marietta, Georgia 

Frank Richardson Sells 
Athens, Tennessee 

Charnel Sterling Sexton 
Red Oak, Georgia 

Malcome Donald Sides 
Burnsville, North Carolina 



John F. Sloop 
Lithonia, Georgia 

Stephen Jamison Sloop, Jr. 
Gainesville, Georgia 

Robert Lee Smith, Jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 

James C. Strickland, Jr. 
Edison, Georgia 



B.A., Oglethorpe University 
B.D., Nashotah House Theological 

Seminary 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 

A.B., Davidson College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

B.A., Howard College (now Samford 

University) 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary, Kentucky 

A.B., Samford University 

B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 

Seminary 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Mercer University 
B.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Asbury College 
M.A., M.Div., Drew Theological 
Seminary 

A.B., Asbury College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Mercer University 
B.D., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Baylor University 

B.D., Th.M., Southeastern Baptist 

Theological Seminary 
M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

at Greensboro 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Wheaton College 
M.Div., Th.M., Columbia Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Samford University 
M.Div., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 



78 



Joseph Edward Sutherland 
Johnson City, Tennessee 

William H. Thomas 

Prestonsburg, Kentucky 



Robert L. Thompson 
Fort Valley, Georgia 



Calvin Lloyd Vermeire 
Gulf Shores, Alabama 

Victor Hugo Wallace 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Roy Edgar Watkins 

Fort Mill, South Carolina 

James R. Wilburn 
Jackson, Mississippi 

Benjamin Franklin Wright 
Jackson, Georgia 



Donn Wilson Wright 
Decatur, Georgia 

Harold Deaton Zwald 
Atlanta, Georgia 



A.B., Milligan College 
B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

B.A., Grove City College 
M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological 

Seminary 
S.T.M. New York Theological Seminary 

A.B., Mercer University 
M.Ed., University of Georgia 
B.D., New Orleans Theological 
Seminary 

B.S., Ohio Northern University 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of Alabama 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Furman University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Belhaven College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Georgia State University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology 
Th.M., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Denison University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Emory University 
B.D., Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 



MASTER OF THEOLOGY 

Roger A. Armistead 
Dallas, Texas 

Ralph Lamar Barden 
Lilburn, Georgia 



Marcus Andrew Booker 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Andreas Borter 
Bern, Switzerland 



B.A., Asbury College 

M.Div., Asbury Theological Seminary 

A.B., Georgia State University 
M.Div., New Orleans Baptist 
Theological Seminary 

B.M.E., Georgia Institute of Technology 
B.D., S.T.D., Candler School of 
Theology 

V.D.M., University of Bern 



79 



Lindsey Jonathan Collins 
Decatur, Georgia 

Virginia Felder Conway 
Clarkston, Georgia 

Andrew G. Davis 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Ernest William Davis 
Kings Mountain, North 
Carolina 



Royal Lee Fullerton 
Decatur, Georgia 

Warren Ewing Gardner 
Winder, Georgia 

Ronald James Greer 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Carl Frederick Hall 
Savannah, Georgia 

Billy Joe Harrison 
Memphis, Tennessee 



Yong Ho Kim 
Seoul, Korea 



W. Vernon Luckey, Jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 

David F. Mclnnis 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 

Perry Nathan Miller 
McDonough, Georgia 

Larry Curtis Mitchell 
Decatur, Georgia 

Zoe Lee Wade Murphy 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Robert Lamar Oglesby 
Tucker, Georgia 



B.A., Davidson College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

S.A., University of Georgia 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., University of South Mississippi 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

B.S., Toccoa Falls Institute 

M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 

Education 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Augusta College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

B.S., Geneva College 

M.Div., Pittsburg Theological Seminary 

B.S., Louisiana State University 
M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

B.A., Asbury College 

M.Div., Candler School of Theology 

A.B., Samford University 
B.D., New Orleans Theological 
Seminary 

Th.B., Presbyterian Theological 

Seminary 
M.C.E., Reformed Theological Seminary 

A.B., Newberry College 
M.Div., Lutheran Southern 
Theological Seminary 

B.A., Davidson College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Erskine College 

B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Bethany College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.A., Shorter College 

M.Div., Duke University Divinity School 

B.A., Mercer University 
M.Div., M.R.E., Southwestern 
Theological Seminary 



80 



Margaret Barnes Peery 
Decatur, Georgia 



Douglas Brian Stearns 

Huntington, West Virginia 

Eric Karl Swenson 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Dennis Lee Taylor 

Clarksburg, West Virginia 

Leonard Jackson Taylor 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Allen Paul Weaver, jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 

R. O. "Bill" Weimer, II 
Decatur, Georgia 



Ming Yi Wu 

Hualien, Taiwan 



Kazuhiko Yaegashi 
Isumi, Japan 



A.B., Queens College 
M.Div., Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia 

A.B., King College 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Georgia State University 

M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

A.B., Fairmont State College 
M.Div., Louisville Presbyterian 
Theological Seminary 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary 

B.S., Florida Memorial College 
M.Div., Colgate Rochester Divinity 
School 

B.S., University of Florida 
M.Div., Gordon-Conwell Theological 
Seminary 

B.Ed., National Taiwan Normal 

University 
M.Div., Taiwan Theological Seminary 

B.A., Tohoku Gakuin University 
M.Div., Reformed Theological Seminary 



FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS 



E COMPONENT 

Name 

Home Town 

Katherine Imogene Bennett 

Decatur, Georgia 



Ronald Otto Brauer 
Clearwater, Florida 

William Warren Delozier, Jr. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Robert Daniel Holloway, Jr. 
Florence, Alabama 

William A. Jokela 
Panama City, Florida 



College 

Presbytery or Denomination 

B.R.E., Presbyterian School of 
Christian Education 
Atlanta 

B.A., University of Cincinnati 

Westminster 

B.C.E., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Church of God 

B.A., Samford University 
North Alabama 

B. Music Ed., Stetson University 

St. Johns 



81 



Timothy LaRue Melton 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Donald Ring Olinger 

Roanoke, Virginia 

James Ivan St. John 
Augusta, Georgia 



Cuyler Vivian Smith, Jr. 
Tallahassee, Florida 



B.B.A., Georgia State University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Roanoke College 

St. Andrews 

A.B., Wofford College 
M.A., University of South Carolina 
Augusta-Macon 

B.A., Florida State University 
Florida 



Robert McFaddin Spann 

Ninety-Six, South Carolina 



B.A., Erskine College 
South Carolina 



D COMPONENT 



Joseph Arthur Cordero 
Chula Vista, California 



B.A., University of Alabama in 
Huntsville 
Fayetteville 



Elaine McRobbie 

Kansas City, Missouri 



B.A., West Georgia College 
M.A., Georgia State University 
Atlanta 



C COMPONENT 



Paul O. Ard, Jr. 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.S., Presbyterian College 

Atlanta 



Malcolm Bennett Bishop, 

Kannapolis, North Carolina 



B. A., King College 
Concord 



Robert Adair Blackwood, Jr. 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Donald Lee Bowling 
Conestee, South Carolina 



Samuel David Carriker 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



Hoonjin David Chai 
Seoul, Korea 



B.B.A., Georgia State University 
Church of God 

A. B.,. Presbyterian College 
M.A., Presbyterian School of 
Christian Education 
Orange 

B. A., University of North Carolina at 

Charlotte 

Mecklenburg 

B. A., Florida International University 
Everglades 



83 



Franklin Grimes Colladay, Jr. 
Helena, Arkansas 

Duke Bernard Crawford 
Decatur, Georgia 

Warner Robert Durnell 
West Chester, Pennsylvania 

Terry Robert Dyer 
Tangerine, Florida 

Virginia Simmons Ellis 

Jacksonville, Florida 

John Michael Eubanks 
Atlanta 

Charles Ligon Evans 
Tampa, Florida 



Cheryl Ann Gosa 

Dalton, Georgia 

James Richard Hartsfield 
Cairo, Georgia 

Sally Lodge Henderson 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Richard Bruce Houchens 

Huntsville, Alabama 

Robert Samuel Johnson 
Decatur, Georgia 

Stephen Alden Jones 
Chickamauga, Georgia 

Joel Morgan Long 

Cherryville, North Carolina 

Diana Grace Davis Mahida 
Sacramento, California 

Benjamin Cooper Mathes 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Robert F. McAndrew, Jr. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Georgia Harrison McDonald 
Florence, Alabama 



B.S., Westminster College, Utah 

Arkansas-Union 

B.A., Texas Tech University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Lincoln University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Florida State University 
N.E. Florida, U.P.U.S.A. 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

Suwannee 

B.A., Ceorgia State University 
Birmingham, U.P.U.S.A. 

A.B., Erskine College 
M.A., Presbyterian School of 
Christian Education 
Westminster 

A.B.j., University of Ceorgia 

Athens 

A.B., Valdosta State College 
Southwest Georgia 

A.B., Coker College 
Mecklenburg 

B.A., Culver-Stockton College 

North Alabama 

B.S., Universitv of Louisville 
Atlanta 

B.A., University of Tennessee 
Cherokee 

A. B., Lenoir Rhyne College 
Concord 

B.A., Pembroke State University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis 
Memphis 

B.B.E., Columbia Bible College 

Atlanta 

D.M.D., University of Louisville 

North Alabama 



84 



John Lawrence Mishler 
Akron, Ohio 

Walter Ward Peters 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Kris K. Ramsahai 
Trinidad, West Indies 

Kathryn Hooks Sandifer 

Tucker, Georgia 



Gregory Dennis Schillo 

Ashtabula, Ohio 

Lib McGregor Simmons 
Decatur, Georgia 

Jacalyn Watson Thomas 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Richard Ellsworth Thomas 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

Stuart Thomas Wilson 

Norfolk, Virginia 

Anna Lou Case Winters 

Huntsville, Alabama 



B.A., Eckerd College 

Atlanta 

B.A., Baylor University 

Atlanta 

B.S., Oglethorpe University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Queens College 
M.C.E., Presbyterian School of 

Christian Education 

Atlanta 

B. A., Berry College 
Cherokee 

B. A., Agnes Scott College 

Atlanta 

B.A., Wesleyan College 

Atlanta 

B. A., Boston University 

Atlanta 

B.A., Old Dominion University 
Norfolk 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

North Alabama 



B COMPONENT 



Joanna Moseley Adams 

Decatur, Georgia 

Paul H. Akers 

Dallas, Texas 

Edward Lane Alderman, Jr. 
Nashville, Tennessee 

Earl Van Buren Blankenship, 
Talladega, Alabama 

Douglas William Bower 

Niagara Falls, New York 

Richard Henry Brooks 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B.A., Emory University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Oklahoma University 
Covenant 

B.A., Wake Forest University 
Middle Tennessee 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
North Alabama 

B.S., Oglethorpe University 

United Methodist 

8.5., Jacksonville State University 
North Alabama 



85 



Royce Leonard Browder 

Anniston, Alabama 

Glen Albert Busby 
Gainesville, Florida 

Jimmy M. Cantey 
Decatur, Georgia 

David E. Chadwick 

Orlando, Florida 



Fred Craven Douglas, Jr. 
Huntersville, North Carolina 

Scott Gregory Downing 

Miami, Florida 

Barry Dean Ferguson 

Gainesville, Florida 

Michael Clay Fleenor 
Kingsport, Tennessee 

Truman Burgess Geeslin 
York, Alabama 

Donald Raymond Guterman 

Donalsonville, Georgia 

John Coxwell Hall 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Dolores M. Hayward 
Tucker, Georgia 

Kenneth Monroe Hicks 
Florence, South Carolina 

Bradley Lawrence Huff 

Marianna, Florida 

William Edward Kelly, Jr. 

Winter Park, Florida 

John Edward Kelsay 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Crawford Abel King, III 

St. Louis, Missouri 

J. Bruce Lancaster 

Monroe, Louisiana 



B.S., Jacksonville State University 

North Alabama 

B.A., University of Florida 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

8.5., Bethel College 

Cumberland Presbyterian 

B.A., University of North Carolina- 
Chapel Hill 
Ed.S., University of Florida 
St. Johns 

B.S., Appalachian State University 
Mecklenburg 

B.A., Florida International University 

South Florida 

B.A., University of Florida 
Suwannee 

B.S., University of Tennessee 

Atlanta 

B.S., Livingston University 
Tuscaloosa 

B.S., Georgia Southwestern College 
Southwest Georgia 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Atlanta 

B.A., Skidmore College 

Atlanta 

B.S., Clemson University 
Pee Dee 

B.A., University of West Florida 

North Florida 

B.A., Duke University 
St. Johns 

B. A., Old Dominion University 

Norfolk 

B.C. 5., University of Iowa 
Southeast Missouri 

B.B.A., Northeast Louisiana University 

Pines 



86 



Charles Russell Lee, Jr. 

Hamer, South Carolina 

Gregory Ennis Loskoski 
Anderson, South Carolina 

W. Tyler Martin 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Edward Lewis Mcllwain 
Columbia, South Carolina 



Richard Montgomery Nelson 

Thomson, Georgia 

Robin Shane Owens 

Clinton, South Carolina 

John-Nelson Buttermore Pope 

Bradenton, Florida 

Christopher Allen Price 
Atlanta, Georgia 

William Hunter Ralston 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 

Gary demons Record 
Chattanooga, Tennessee 

Richard Neil Robinson 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Peter R. Roest 

Columbia, South Carolina 

Robert Hoyt Sells 
Lawrenceville, Georgia 

William Judson Shaw 
Prospect, Kentucky 

Gary Robert Soop 

Winter Park, Florida 

John Hillman Stuhl 
Orlando, Florida 

Eleanor Anderson Thompson 

Spartanburg, South Carolina 

William Barnett Wade, Jr. 
Decatur, Georgia 

George M. Walton 
Washington, Georgia 

Philip Albert Williams 
Chipley, Florida 



A. B., Atlantic Christian College 
Pee Dee 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

Piedmont 

B.I.E., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Atlanta 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
B.A., University of Maryland 
Congaree 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Savannah 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

South Carolina 

B.A., Stetson University 

Westminster 

B.A., University of Georgia 

Southern Baptist 

B. A., Davidson College 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

B.A., Temple College 
M.A., Peabody College 

Knoxville 

A.B., University of California at 
Berkeley 

Atlanta 

B.A., University of South Carolina 
Congaree 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney College 

Southern Baptist 

B.G.S., University of Kentucky 

Louisville Union 

B.A., University of Florida 
St. Johns 

B.A., Maryville College 

St. Johns 

B.A., Winthrop College 
Piedmont 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Atlanta 

B.B.A., Georgia State University 
Augusta-Macon 

B.A., University of Florida 

Florida 



87 



Joseph Rennie Woody, Jr. 

Penn Laird, Virginia 

Bowling Cox Yates, III 
Marietta, Georgia 



B. A., King College 

Highlands 

B.S., Georgia State University 
Cherokee 



A COMPONENT 



James B. Arnold, Jr. 
Crossett, Arkansas 

Ashton Edwin Ayers, Jr. 

Decatur, Georgia 



Phillip Walker Boswell 

Morrow, Georgia 

Georgianna Via Brabban 
Falls View, West Virginia 

Elwyn Blake Bryant 

Starkville, Mississippi 

Margaret Miller Chamblee 

Dalton, Georgia 

Dean Walter Chapman 

Orlando, Florida 

Wendell Harvey Colson, Jr. 
Leesburg, Florida 

Albert T. Cramer 

Johnson City, Tennessee 

Carl Roberts Crawford 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Milton Scott Davis 
Memphis, Tennessee 

Stan Allen Dawson 
Avondale Estates, Georgia 

Mark E. Diehl 
Lubbock, Texas 

Kerry Perron Duncan 
Lubbock, Texas 

Julian Decherd Guess 
Union, South Carolina 

Sam Lewis Hall, Jr. 
Olivia, North Carolina 



B.B.A., University of Mississippi 
Pines 

B.M., Florida State University 
M.M., Florida State University 
Florida 

B.S., University of Georgia 

Southern Baptist 

B.S., West Liberty State College 
Greenbrier 

B.A., University of Texas 
St. Andrew 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 

Cherokee 

B.A., Oberlin College 
St. Johns 

B.B.A., Stetson University 
St. Johns 

B.S., East Tennessee State University 
Holston 

B.A., Emory University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Memphis State University 
Episcopalian 

B.B.A., Georgia State University 

Atlanta 

B.A., Texas Tech University 
Palo Duro 

A.B., University of Georgia 

Palo Duro 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Piedmont 

B.A., Atlantic Christian College 
Fayetteville 



88 



William Hugh Hamilton, III 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 

Robert Steven Hudder 
St. Louis, Missouri 

Michael Walker Jackson 

Columbus, Georgia 

Carolyn M. Johnson 
Decatur, Georgia 

Robert Eugene Lee 
Winston-Salem, North Carloina 

Billy Troy Lowe 

Honea Path, South Carolina 

Robert H. McBride, jr. 
Conway, South Carolina 

Leland Graves McCullough, li 

Shreveport, Louisiana 

Cliff Hill McLeod, Jr. 
Sumter, South Carolina 

James Lauder Morgan 

Laurel Hill, North Carolina 

Daniel Allan Nail 
Jacksonville, Florida 

John Stephen Park 
Lithonia, Georgia 

William Clark Pender 
Marietta, Georgia 

Kevin Frederic Price 

Gainesville, Georgia 

Maria Lolita Kristen 

Rutland Price 

Macon, Georgia 

Carleton Thornton Pridgen 
Asheville, North Carolina 

William Joseph Reggin 
Tampa, Florida 

Jeanne' Hoechst Ronner 

New Haven, Connecticut 

John Lewis Sanderford 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 



B.A., Wake Forest University 
Piedmont 

B.S., Westminster College 
United Church of Christ 

B.B.A., University of Georgia 
Southwest Georgia 

B.A., University of Minnesota 
M.Ed., Boston University 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

B.A., Evangel College 
Concord 

B.A., Newberry College 
South Carolina 

8.S., The Citadel 
Charleston 

B.A., Washington & Lee University 
Pines 

B.A., Presbyterian College 
Harmony 

B.A., Wake Forest University 
Fayetteville 

B.S.Ed., University of Florida 
Suwannee 

B.A., Georgia State University 

Atlanta 

B.A., Dartmouth College 
Cherokee 

A.B., Harvard University 
Athens 

B.A., Emory University 
Augusta-Macon 



B.S., University of South Carolina 

Asheville 

B.A., University of South Florida 
Westminster 

B.A., Berry College 
St. Johns 

B.S., University of North Carolina 
Chapel Hill 

Concord 



89 



Daniel Neil Sansbury 

Darlington, South Carolina 

Charles Mark Scott 
Chamblee, Georgia 

Edward James Wojtczak 
Monroe, Georgia 

David Logan Young 
Asheville, North Carolina 



Emmie Caldwell Young 
Atlanta, Georgia 



B. A., University of South Carolina 
Pee Dee 

A.B., Georgia State University 
Atlanta 

B.A., Southeastern Bible College 

Atlanta 

B.S., Virginia Commonwealth 
University 

Asheville 

B.A., Vanderbilt University 
Atlanta 



INTERNS 

Ronald Joseph Allen 

Clinton, South Carolina 

Richard Thomas Gillespie, IV 

Alachua, Florida 

James Arthur Wood, III 

Rockville, Maryland 



B.A., Presbyterian College 
South Carolina 

B.A., University of South Florida 

Suwannee 

B.A., Washington and Lee University 
National Capitol Union 



MASTER OF THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 



Gerald Bailey 
Atlanta, Georgia 

Charles Markham Berry 
Atlanta, Georgia 



Elisabeth Bibby 

Dallas, Texas 



Ira Lois Brown 

Decatur, Georgia 



Fairman Preston Cumming 

Decatur, Georgia 



B.A., LaVerne College 
Baptist 

B.S., Emory University 

M.D., Emory University School of 

Medicine 

Atlanta 

B.A., University of Arkansas 
M.A., University of Dallas 
Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

£.5., Georgia Southern College 
M.Ln., Emory University 
Dip., Trinity College, Dublin 

Episcopalian 

8.S., Davidson College 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
Atlanta 



90 



Harriette Elaine Griffin 

Monroe, Georgia 

Melvin Frank Schell, Jr. 
Tucker, Georgia 

Lee Anderson Wyatt 

Decatur, Georgia 



A. B. f University of Georgia 

Atlanta 

B.A., Tennessee Temple College 

Christian Missionary Alliance 

B.A., Belhaven College 

Atlanta 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Asumang-Birikorang 

Agona, Kwanyako 

Patte N. Buice 

Atlanta, Georgia 

David Michael Currie 

Pensacola, Florida 

Elizabeth Brooks Elliott 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 

David M. Fry 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Glenn Elijah Hicks 

Florence, South Carolina 

Daisy Glenn Jones 

Clearwater, Florida 



Judith Walker Moore 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Casmero John Moriale 

Tampa, Florida 

Harry D. Nicholas, Jr. 
Arlington, Texas 

Eun Soo Oh 

Seoul, Korea 



John Michael Stuart 

Atlanta, Georgia 

Gerald Kirkbride Taylor, Jr. 

Fort Myers, Florida 



L.Th., University of Ghana, Legon 
Dip. Th., Trinity College 

Presbyterian Church of Ghana 

B.A., Oglethorpe University 
M.Ed., Georgia State University 

Episcopalian 

B.S.W., University of West Florida 

Episcopalian 

B. A., Presbyterian College 

Atlanta 

B.S., University of Tennessee 
M.A., Young Life Institute 

Atlanta 

B. A., East Texas Baptist College 
Covenant 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis 
M.A., Presbyterian School of Christian 
Education 

Westminster 

B.A., Emory University 

Atlanta 

A. A., Hillsborough Community College 

Westminster 

B.A., University of Texas at Arlington 

Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

Doshisha University in japan 

B.D., Western Theological Seminary 

Th.M., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary 

Korean Presbyterian Church 

B.A., Presbyterian College 

Presbyterian Church in the U.S. 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Westminster 



91 



UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 



Florida B. Battle 
Eila M. Brummer 
Gerald David Fikes 
William T. Ginn, Jr. 
Joseph S. Harvard 



E. Walter Hood 
William Lester Jenkins, Jr. 
Nell Hodgson Watt 
E. D. Wilson, Jr. 



STUDENTS REGISTERED ONLY FOR WINTER 
AND/OR SPRING QUARTERS 1977 



Richard Kenneth Gunter 
Lila McGeachy Ray 



Wayne Keller Ware 
Agnes Hill Wood 



SUMMER LANGUAGE SCHOOL 1977 



James B. Arnold, Jr. 
Ashton Edwin Ayers, Jr. 
Robert Henry Bohler, Jr. 
Georgianna V. Brabban 
Glen Albert Busby 
Clyde B. Carter 
Mark S. Clark 
Wendell H. Colson, Jr. 
Albert T. Cramer 
Carl R. Crawford 
Duke B. Crawford 
Fairman P. Cumming 
Linda L. Dowling 
Stephen J. Gill 
W. Hugh Hamilton, III 
Michael W. Jackson 
Carolyn M. Johnson 
Robert S. Johnson 
Billy T. Lowe 



Robert H. McBride 
Leah P. McKell 
James L. Morgan, Jr. 
Zoe Wade Murphy 
Daniel A. Nail 
John Stephen Park 
William C. Pender 
Walter W. Peters 
Carleton T. Pridgen 
William H. Ralston 
Jeanne Hoechst Ronner 
Maria L. Rutland 
John Lewis Sanderford 
Charles Mark Scott 
William Judson Shaw 
John Michael Stuart 
Eleanor A. Thompson 
John R. Willett 
David L. Young 




Professor Wallace conducting continuing education 



92 



CALENDAR 



Greek School 



Introductory Term 
Classes begin 
Thanksgiving vacation 
Classes end 
Exams 



7977-78 



Summer 



1978-79 



1979-80 



July 6- July 6- July 2- 

Aug. 30, 1977 Aug. 30, 1978 Aug. 24, 1979 



Fall 



Student Faculty Retreat Sept. 1-2 



Sept. 6-7 
Sept. 8 
Nov. 24-27 
Dec. 9 
Dec. 12-15 



August 31- 
Sept. 1 

Sept. 5-6 

Sept. 7 

Nov. 23-26 

Dec. 8 

Dec. 11-15 



August 30-31 

Sept. 4-5 
Sept. 6 
Nov. 22-25 
Dec. 7 
Dec. 10-14 



Classes begin 
Classes end 
Exams 
Ministers Week 



Winter 

Jan. 3, 1978 Jan. 3, 1979 

Jan. 30 Jan. 30 

Jan. 31 Jan. 30 



Jan. 2, 1980 
Jan. 29 
Jan. 29 



Jan. 31-Feb. 3 Jan. 30-Feb. 2 Jan. 29-Feb. 1 



Spring 



Classes begin 


Feb. 6 


Feb. 5 


Feb. 4 


College Conference 


Feb. 10-12 






Easter vacation 


March 24- 
April 2 


April 7-15 


March 29- 
April 6 


Conference on Ministry 


April 28-30 






Exams for graduates 


May 11-12 


May 10-11 


May 8-9 


Exams 


May 15-18 


May 14-18 


May 12-16 


Commencement 


May 21 


May 20 


May 18 



93 



INDEX 



Academic Information 

Administration 

Admissions Procedure 

Alumni/ae Association 

Atlanta Theol. Assn. 

Auditors 

Awards and Prizes 

Board of Directors 

Bookstore 

Calendar 



7-19 Financial Information 54,56-57 



60-61 Grading System 



53 



51,52,73 

62-63 

56 

93 



Clinical Pastoral Education 53 



Columbia Friendship Circle 53 
Conferences 6 



Continuing Education 

Courses of Instruction 

Curriculum 

Doctor of Ministry 
(in-ministry) 

Doctor of Ministry 
(in-sequence) 



53 



19-44 



16-17 



13-14 



7-9 



Doctor of Sacred Theology 

(S.T.D.) 14-16 



Faculty 
Fellowships 



65-71 
52, 55, 56 



Graduation Class-1977 



Greek School 



51 History of Columbia 



Housing 
International Students 



Lectures 

Introductory Term 

Library 

Master of Divinity 
(M.Div.) 

Master of Theological 
Studies (M.T.S.) 

Master of Theology 
(Th.M.) 

Ordination Exams 
Professional Assessment 
Radio and TV 
Roll of Students 
Special Students 
Student Organizations 
Summer Session 
Transfer Students 
Unclassified Students 



46 



72 



50 



2-3 



55 



51 
45 
51 

7-9 

9-10 

11-13 

50 
9 

53 

75-92 

5 

58 

50 
5 
5 



94 



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Please send the following materials 
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Th.M S.T.D. 



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(please print) 

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DIRECTORY FOR CORRESPONDENCE 
Telephone (404) 378-8821 

Address inquiries to the following at Columbia Seminary, Decatur, Georgia 30031 

Concerning general information about the Seminary, gifts and bequests 
J. Davison Philips, President 

Concerning admission, placement, and Columbia Friendship Circle 

Harry H. Barrow, Director of Admissions and Associate Director of Seminary Relations 

Concerning scholarships, financial aid, and student preaching 
T. Erskine Clarke, Dean of Students 

Concerning supervised ministry and clinical placement 

Jasper N. Keith, Jr., Associate Professor of Supervised Ministry 

Concerning business matters and housing 

F. Sidney Anderson, Business Manager and Treasurer 

Concerning transcripts, academic records, curriculum and faculty 
Charles B. Cousar, Dean of Academic Affairs 

Concerning graduate studies and continuing education 
James D. Newsome, Jr., Director of Advanced Studies 

Concerning alumni matters, church relations, campaigns, wills and bequests 
Richard A. Dodds, Director of Seminary Relations 



COLUMBIA CATALOG SERIES 

Annual Publication 

1. Academic Catalog — February 

Periodic Publications 

2. Introducing Columbia Theological Seminary 

3. History/Memorials/Resources and Opportunities 



NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY 
AS TO STUDENTS 

Columbia Theological Seminary admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic 
origin to all the rights, privileges program, and activities generally accorded or made 
available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, 
national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions 
policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other school-administered programs. In 
regard to compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 
Columbia Theological Seminary does not discriminate on the basis of handicap in ad- 
mission to or access to, or treatment, or employment in, its programs and activities. 



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